Laura Berlinsky-Schine
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It seems like everyone is quitting these days. During the Great Resignation, people are constantly looking for greener pastures, and it’s enough to make you wonder: “Should I be leaving, too?”

But maybe you don’t want to leave. You like your job, and you feel comfortable. Still, you can’t help feeling the FOMO (fear of missing out) that comes along with watching your friends and colleagues find new opportunities, while you’re left behind. 

You don’t have to follow, just because everyone else is doing it. But you do need to find a way to curb those anxious, even envious feelings.

1. Reflect on your goals.

This is a good practice no matter what the context. Reflecting on your goals routinely will get you one step closer to achieving them. When you take the time to think about your professional objectives, you’ll gain a greater understanding of what’s really important to you. 

Then, connect those ambitions and your values to your work. How is your job allowing you to meet those goals? Think, too, about how you might change your approach to better address challenges and obstacles and the role your job plays in the bigger picture of your entire career. 

2. Reacquaint yourself with your job and your workplace.

This one comes from Nihar Chhaya, an executive coach. In the Harvard Business Review, he encourages professionals to “develop your own ‘re-onboarding plan.’” That’s because the new hires, the ones who are replacing the colleagues who are quitting, are probably learning the ropes and rules as they become acquainted with your organization.

Meanwhile, it may have been a long time since you learned the ropes for the first time. If you make time to effectively re-onboard yourself, you’ll see your workplace with fresh eyes and a new perspective. This could even give you a renewed sense of purpose, as well as remind you about the ins and outs of your job.

3. Help your new colleagues.

Build your reputation as a team player and supportive colleague by helping your new colleagues adjust. This will not only benefit your coworkers but will also make you an important member of the team and demonstrate that you care about the success of the business, not just yourself. 

Small gestures like introducing your new team member to a leader at the organization, inviting them to lunch or even teaching them how to use that fickle copy machine won’t go unnoticed, and when it comes time for opportunities to lead a project or get a promotion, you’ll have proven yourself to be indispensable.

4. Reframe.

Perhaps this isn’t your dream job, even if you don’t completely hate it. But that doesn’t mean it doesn’t have value in your life. Try reframing and consider how your job is helping you enjoy other aspects of your life. Maybe, for example, it enables you to take an amazing vacation, thanks to ample PTO, or affords you excellent work-life balance, so you can spend as much time with your family as you want.

That said, if you’re truly unhappy in your job, don’t be afraid to look elsewhere. Just don’t leave because everyone else doing it — remember that they’re facing challenges, too, and people simply lead different lives!

What's your no. 1 piece of advice for dealing with FOMO when all of your coworkers quit? Share your answer in the comments to help other Fairygodboss'ers!

About the Career Expert:

 Laura Berlinsky-Schine is a freelance writer and editor based in Brooklyn with her demigod/lab mix Hercules. She specializes in education, technology and career development. She also writes satire and humor, which has appeared in Slackjaw, Points in Case, Little Old Lady Comedy, Jane Austen’s Wastebasket and The Haven.

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