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BY Fairygodboss

Campbell Soup's New Parental Leave Policy

Campbell Soup

Photo credit: Creative Commons

TAGS: Parental leave, Maternity leave, Paternity leave, Women in the workplace

Campbell Soup just took a major step in announcing the company’s first parental leave policy, a gender-neutral policy that provides 10 weeks of paid time off for a primary caretaker, and 2 weeks of paid time off for a secondary caregiver for the birth or adoption of a new child.

CEO Denise Morrison (one of the few women CEOs in the Fortune 500) explained to the Huffington Post that the time was right because so many millennial mothers were their consumers. “We are all about millennial mothers, and this is really good for consumers.” In other words, their customers and the views of their customers seemed to be a driving motivation. Although we’ve seen other companies explain the way millennials have impacted their parental leave policies, this is one of the first times we’ve seen the rationale for an internal policy be driven by external stakeholders.

The Huffington Post also observed that Campbell’s acquisition of the company Plum Organics, a B-corporation, may have had something to do with their decision. Plum Organics, as a subsidiary of their company offered a more generous leave policy (8 weeks of paid maternity leave and 2 weeks of paternity leave) than it’s parent company until this announcement.

Earlier this month, two other giants in the consumer packaged goods industry, Coca-Cola and Anheuser-Busch announced expanded parental leave benefits. Coca-Cola announced it’s first paid parental leave policy which was gender neutral, and driven by millennial employees. Anheuser-Busch also expanded it’s leave for primary caretakers to 16 weeks. Now all three companies have given new moms a reason to feel better about their products when it comes to their weekly shopping!

P.S. If you’re interested in seeing more about the recent history of announcements on corporate parental leave policies, you might want to follow along with our Parental Leave Tracker, where we’re keeping tabs!

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace for women.

Related Community Discussions

  • Does anyone here work for a major financial institution in the new york metropolitan area? I have yet to find a straight answer on the internet or the company website regarding when my eligibilty for 16 week paid maternity leave would start. Are paid maternity leave benefits usually the same across the board for all major financial firms? I just found out I am pregnant (in my first trimester) and by the time I take my maternity leave I would be only nine months in my new job. Would like to hear about your company's eligibility requirements for paid maternity leave here please. Thank you so much...

  • I recently got engaged, will be married October 2017. My fiance and I want to start a family right away. My job does not have paid maternity leave. Would it be premature for me to advocate for paid leave? My initial thought process was to figure this out as soon as possible. Maybe I should start looking for another job; researching other companies I noticed that most (all the one's that I saw) require employees to have been employed for a year before being offered paid maternity leave.

    If I could have my way I would stay where I am at and get paid leave.

    I have a positive relationship with my boss and can talk about this with him, however; he isn't the one who ultimately makes this decision, corporate does.

  • I am currently 36 weeks pregnant and gearing up to go on maternity leave at the end of the month. I recently came across a new job oppurnity that would be better for my family. I'm at the finishing stages of interviewing with this new company and I am worried that I will find out I got the job while on maternity leave. My question is, what happens to my maternity benefits and how do I go about leaving my current job without issue?

  • Any advice for someone searching for work during their first trimester of pregnancy? I currently work with a temp agency for income and am applying for my next role. From what I've read on the boards, it seems that most women are firmly established at their companies but I was forced to look for a new role outside of my former company due to a health condition. They were unwilling to move me to a different role within the company. Any suggestions on how to navigate the next 4-6 months before giving birth?

  • I'm 12 weeks pregnant and just met with HR to find out about our Maternity Leave program only to learn that they only give us unpaid leave (you have to file for state disability to get your 55% salary during those weeks) In talking with other moms, I found they all came back early (because who can really afford to take a big pay cut when you have a new little one to tend to?)

    It never occurred to me to check because kids weren't on the radar when I applied for the job, but I'm totally disheartened that my company that "prides itself" on caring about its people doesn't have something better in place. Has anyone gone to HR to see about improving their policies? I know as a whole our organization had a 12 year tenure when I started and a pretty high average age, so it may have not been on their radar, but I'm shocked that they aren't more progressive. Any advice??

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Campbell Soup's New Parental Leave Policy

Campbell Soup's New Parental Leave Policy

Campbell Soup just took a major step in announcing the company’s first parental leave policy, a gender-neutral policy that provides 10 weeks of ...

Campbell Soup just took a major step in announcing the company’s first parental leave policy, a gender-neutral policy that provides 10 weeks of paid time off for a primary caretaker, and 2 weeks of paid time off for a secondary caregiver for the birth or adoption of a new child.

CEO Denise Morrison (one of the few women CEOs in the Fortune 500) explained to the Huffington Post that the time was right because so many millennial mothers were their consumers. “We are all about millennial mothers, and this is really good for consumers.” In other words, their customers and the views of their customers seemed to be a driving motivation. Although we’ve seen other companies explain the way millennials have impacted their parental leave policies, this is one of the first times we’ve seen the rationale for an internal policy be driven by external stakeholders.

The Huffington Post also observed that Campbell’s acquisition of the company Plum Organics, a B-corporation, may have had something to do with their decision. Plum Organics, as a subsidiary of their company offered a more generous leave policy (8 weeks of paid maternity leave and 2 weeks of paternity leave) than it’s parent company until this announcement.

Earlier this month, two other giants in the consumer packaged goods industry, Coca-Cola and Anheuser-Busch announced expanded parental leave benefits. Coca-Cola announced it’s first paid parental leave policy which was gender neutral, and driven by millennial employees. Anheuser-Busch also expanded it’s leave for primary caretakers to 16 weeks. Now all three companies have given new moms a reason to feel better about their products when it comes to their weekly shopping!

P.S. If you’re interested in seeing more about the recent history of announcements on corporate parental leave policies, you might want to follow along with our Parental Leave Tracker, where we’re keeping tabs!

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace for women.

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