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BY Fairygodboss

Improving Your Salary in 2016

Money matters

Photo credit: Getty Images via Fortune

TAGS: Negotiating, Wage gap, Compensation, Gender equality

Our friends at Payscale wrote a great piece full of advice about what to do if you're staring ahead into another work year without a pay raise.

The author, Lydia Frank, talks about a few trends that will support you in your effort to get more money. First, she points out an encouraging trend towards more salary transparency. The more you know about what co-workers make, or people with comparable backgrounds and job descriptions earn, the more likely you are to understand whether your wages are in line with marketplace rates.

Second, Frank raises the idea that the first step towards making a change is realizing that you may need to ask for what you want. For example, we were surprised to read that men, on average, initiate negotiations four times as frequently as women and ask for 30% more than women do. 

Finally, Frank points out that some employers are evaluating compensation practices in terms of gender because it's the right thing to do (and probably helps retain employees, too). Salesforce and GoDaddy, for example, have been leaders in this area. 

Unfortunately, we can't all work for enlightened employers. For most of us, that means we'll have to simply do our due diligence, ask for what we want, and make sure we keep exploring our job options if the answer is a 'no'.

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women.
Join us by reviewing your employer!
 

 

Related Community Discussions

  • I recently got engaged, will be married October 2017. My fiance and I want to start a family right away. My job does not have paid maternity leave. Would it be premature for me to advocate for paid leave? My initial thought process was to figure this out as soon as possible. Maybe I should start looking for another job; researching other companies I noticed that most (all the one's that I saw) require employees to have been employed for a year before being offered paid maternity leave.

    If I could have my way I would stay where I am at and get paid leave.

    I have a positive relationship with my boss and can talk about this with him, however; he isn't the one who ultimately makes this decision, corporate does.

  • All women should read the amazing negotiation advice in the book, "Women in Tech: Take your Career to the Next Level" by Tarah Wheeler. I applied the advice in a recent negotiation round and got a 15% bump in salary!

    Anybody have good advice for how to request a raise that's worked?

    Great article here: "http://www.geekwire.com/2016/book-excerpt-4-negotiating-tactics/"

  • Any tips on how to ask for maternity leave policy when getting a job offer? I really want to make sure I'm going somewhere that has something decent but they aren't on this site yet and I can't find info online for it.

  • This week, there were layoffs at my company - and I've been given a second department to manage. With no pay increase. Is that typical? Would a man be more likely to have gotten a raise with incremental responsibility? Do I have any leverage here?

  • Hello! I have been at my organization for 10+ years, and raises are few and far between because we're a state agency. However, I recently realized (because state salaries are public info) that two other folks with my same position title make a minimum of $19,000 more than I do. While our jobs are a bit different, our workloads are similar, and my position has the most impact on public perception of the agency. I can easily support my argument that I deserve a promotion/raise with specific examples of things I've done and contributions I've made to the agency. However, it's hard not to compare myself to my peers. Is there a way I can tactfully bring up the discrepancy in pay? One of those two employees with the same title has been there less time than I have but has a master's degree, and the other has been there slightly longer than I have but doesn't have a master's; I realize there may be other circumstances at play that would warrant a higher salary but not a nearly $20k difference! The problem is, no matter how long I stay at this agency, there would never be a way for me to attain a salary akin to what they're currently making (because as I mentioned, raises are few and far between), so I don't find that fair. Does anyone have any advice? Do I just need to be looking elsewhere?

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Improving Your Salary in 2016

Improving Your Salary in 2016

Our friends at Payscale  wrote a great piece full of advice about what to do if you're staring ahead into another work year without a pay raise. T...

Our friends at Payscale wrote a great piece full of advice about what to do if you're staring ahead into another work year without a pay raise.

The author, Lydia Frank, talks about a few trends that will support you in your effort to get more money. First, she points out an encouraging trend towards more salary transparency. The more you know about what co-workers make, or people with comparable backgrounds and job descriptions earn, the more likely you are to understand whether your wages are in line with marketplace rates.

Second, Frank raises the idea that the first step towards making a change is realizing that you may need to ask for what you want. For example, we were surprised to read that men, on average, initiate negotiations four times as frequently as women and ask for 30% more than women do. 

Finally, Frank points out that some employers are evaluating compensation practices in terms of gender because it's the right thing to do (and probably helps retain employees, too). Salesforce and GoDaddy, for example, have been leaders in this area. 

Unfortunately, we can't all work for enlightened employers. For most of us, that means we'll have to simply do our due diligence, ask for what we want, and make sure we keep exploring our job options if the answer is a 'no'.

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women.
Join us by reviewing your employer!
 

 

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