These Companies Are Hiring Like Crazy In Chicago

Photo Credit: Flickr / Pedro Szekely

By Fairygodboss

READ MORE: Diversity, Job search, Mentorship, Accenture, The Boston Consulting Group, Company culture, Consulting, Flexibility, Johnson & Johnson, Technology, West Monroe Partners, ZS, Bank of America Corporation, CDW Corporation, DRW

Chicago may be known for its sports teams, the Willis Tower and the Magnificent Mile — but did you know that it’s also an amazing place to work?

There are a ton of great companies looking for talented women, and many are specifically looking to hire in their Chicago offices. If you’re based in Chicago and looking for a new role, or are looking to move to the Windy City, here are some companies that you should consider applying to.

1) CDW Corporation: This technology-focused company is passionate about inclusion. Their award-winning training programs provide all entry-level employees with the support they need to succeed, and CDW continuously provides opportunity for professional growth. Along with hosting an annual Women in IT summit to support their female coworkers, CDW also connects college women to Fortune 500 tech companies to ensure they advance in their STEM careers.

2) Bank of America: Financial professionals tend to work under a lot of pressure, but those at BoA receive the corporate support they need to thrive in their careers. Women make up 55 percent of the Bank of America workforce, and they’re well represented by the women who make up 33 percent of senior management. BoA also offers top-notch wellness programs, great health care benefits and flexible spending accounts to help with caregiving.

3) The Boston Consulting Group: Don’t let the name fool you! The Boston Consulting Group has a huge global presence, not just a presence in Boston, Massachusetts.  BCG is committed to supporting their female team members, and their global Women@BCG program offers sponsorship and mentorship opportunities, flexible work programs and even a Working Mother Forum to connect moms to their BCG peers. BCG advises clients from all industries, and they offer the same world-class support to their employees.

4) DRW: As DRW has grown to encompass more than 750 employees, its teams and affiliated companies (including DRW Venture Capital and Vigilant) need more support than ever before. DRW has brought technology, risk management and research together in a unique way; it’s one of the reasons they’ve seen so much success over the past 25 years. They truly believe that their business becomes stronger with more diversity, and have plenty of resources to support their team.

5) West Monroe Partners: Even though West Monroe is well established as a consulting firm, they still have a start-up mentality that defines their company culture. As West Monroe continues to expand in the Central U.S., they’re looking for individuals to work directly with their clients. They’re expecting over 15 percent growth in the coming year, so now’s a great time to join a company with a strong success record (and a bright future).

6) Accenture:  Accenture has publicly committed to achieving a gender-balanced workforce by 2025 and they have the resources in place to support women as they join the Accenture team. They have over 90 local women’s support groups as well as inclusive work policies that include generous maternity leave, care-taking benefits, and flexible work options. It’s no wonder the company was named as one of the Working Mother Top 10 Best Companies for Working Mothers.

7) ZS: Though the company is headquartered in Evanston, Illinois, ZS’s focus on solving problems spans across the world. (And yes, including Chicago!) ZS prides themselves on a meritocracy-focused culture; they really care about their employees and offer them the respect, flexibility, and connections to succeed. Though they’re looking for women to fill jobs in their company, they’re equally committed to supporting them throughout their entire career.

8) Johnson & Johnson: Women who work at Johnson & Johnson report that it's a "great company when it comes to worklife balance" and that "women raise each other up." Plus, Johnson & Johnson has a mission everyone can get behind: helping billions of people live longer, happier and healthier lives.

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