Article creator image

BY Samantha Shankman

The Most Important Interview Step That Most Women Miss

woman emailing

Photo credit: Pexels

TAGS: Interview, Job search, Career advice, Career development

You researched the company, dressed the part, formed a sincere connection with your interviewer and nailed all the answers. Your mind is buzzing with excitement imagining the future growth and unlimited potential awaiting you at this dream of a company.

Now, however, is not the time to daydream. There is a window of opportunity in the space between acing an interview and signing the dotted line that can have an important impact on the impression you make. The post-interview period is a chance to show the company that you are diligent in following up, a clear communicator, and yes, pretty freaking excited about the role!

Here are 5 tips on how to stand out after the interview.

1. Follow Up within 12 - 24 Hours

Wait at least 12 hours or until the following business day to send a follow up email. This shows the employer that you took time to reflect on your conversation, weighed the pros and cons, and are ready to move ahead with confidence and positive energy.

Waiting longer than 24 hours to follow up, however, suggests the position might not be a top priority or that the company is perhaps one of many potential job interests.

2. Keep your follow email direct and positive.

Most interviewers are busy employees and your interview is likely one of several tasks that they are handling at the moment. Increase your chances of receiving a response by writing a direct email expressing that you are excited about the role and that you’ve used the information provided to further think of ways that you can contribute to the company. This will also show that you’re a clear communicator and respect her inbox.

We provide a template and an example of post-interview emails below!

3. Track the Sector

Keep an eye on what’s happening in the sector either through a Tweetdeck column dedicated to the company and its competitors/collaborators or through email alerts.

If there’s any big news that happens in the days following the interview, you could Favorite a Tweet, Like a LinkedIn post, or even send a quick email congratulating the company on their newest acquisition or product launch. This shows that you are interested and active in the sector whether or not you take on this particular role.

4. Keep Your Options Open

Keep applying to jobs that spark your interest! There are many reasons why this particular opportunity might not work out so it is a great idea to always be applying. Researching the endless opportunities available to you will keep your energy high and spirits motivated, which will come through next time you speak with the interviewer.

You might even find a job better suited to you in this post-interview period. It’s important to remember that you are interviewing the company as much as they are interviewing you. You are a valuable asset to any company and your energy will communicate that.

5. Send a second follow up.

If you don’t hear back within 4-5 business days, send a second brief follow-up letting the company know that you are still excited about the opportunity and offer to send a brief sample of the work that you would be doing for the company.

What happens if you decide the job is not for you in this time? Send an appreciate quick note thanking the interviewer for her time, alerting her that you will not be taking the role and wish her the best of luck.

Below we provide a template and an example of post-interview emails that you can adapt to any role. Best of luck!

Follow Up Template:

Hi [interviewer or HR point person],

Thank you very much for taking the time to speak with me on [date]! I really enjoyed learning more about [company name]’s approach and workplace and am very excited about the potential to build [the primary topic or task you discussed.]

Our conversation really solidified my interest in the position. I am confident that I can hit the ground running and already brainstormed two ideas related to [a topic or task you discussed], which I’ve included below:

  • Brief idea #1 [One to two sentences max.]
  • Brief idea #2

Please let me know if you have any questions or I can provide any additional information at all. I can also be reached at (XXX) XXX-XXXX.

Thank you for your time and I look forward to hearing from you!

All the best,

Samantha

Follow Up Sample:

Hello Dominic,

I hope everything is going well. Thank you for connecting me with Jorge!

We had a great meeting this morning during which he showed me around the site and explained Company's goals in more detail. Our meeting solidified my interest in this project. The site looks beautiful and I think it has huge potential to grow.

I think it is a site that I can really hit the ground running with by writing news briefs and aggregating stories, but I'm also really excited by the opportunity to help build a trustworthy site and brand in all ways possible. My work in multiple newsrooms, both on the editorial and operations side, has provided some experiences that I think will be helpful moving forward.

Please let me know if you have any questions at all or I can provide any additional information. I can also be reached at (XXX) XXX-XXXX.

I look forward to hearing from you.

All the best,

Samantha

--

Samantha Shankman is a freelance business reporter and writer whose work has appeared in CNN, NBC, Travel & Leisure, Skift and Mic. She's also helped develop content for large brands including Bayer, Sakara Life, Sojern, and MindBodyGreen. You can follow her Twitter at @SamShankman and see more of her work at samanthashankman.com.

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women. 
Join us by reviewing your employer!



Related Community Discussions

  • I am trying to change career paths. I was laid off in Nov. 2016. I spoke with a master resume writer yesterday who recommended an entirely new resume, LinkedIn overhaul, valuation letter and summary/biography all for close to $3000. I also received a call for an interview for a part-time job, $10/hour, no benefits. Needless to say I burst into tears by the end of the day.

    I had high hope when I obtained my law degree (especially after working full-time & attending night classes). I've tried contacting the law school and my undergrad career centers but have received only nominal assistance. They both wished me luck, gave me login's to their job portals and had nothing more to suggest.

    Someone mentioned networking & I agree that is an option but here in Michigan is comes with a fee to attend events, seminars or join associations. I understand we are all trying to make money but I graduated from law school during the recession and have 6 figures in student loans. I also am running out of unemployment.

    The master resume writer explained only 15% of people get hired from online applications. Is that true? If so then why are we even bothering with an online system at all? She suggested I find the hiring manager & connect with that person. The hiring manager is sometimes 2 people deep in the company so how do I find the person who told HR that they need a person for X job?

    I've reached out to people on LinkedIn and have not gotten much response or advice. Are there any mentors or HR people that can suggest anything that is free? My mom thinks I should go back to school but with a BA and JD that I am still paying for adding to the debt with no promises that another degree will land me a job doesn't seem wise.

    I am frustrated, disheartened and angry that the process of finding a job has become so convoluted but understand why it has. I've read so many articles on LinkedIn that they conflict with one another...you need a cover letter, no you need a pain letter, don't bother you don't need these because HR won't read it. Your resume needs skills, don't list your skills, list dates, don't list dates, take off references. Which article do I believe? Adding insult to injury the unemployment agency here requires your resume to be uploaded to the talent network. Do you know what companies contacted me expressing interest in my skill-set? Tru-Green lawn care as a fertilizer sprayer and a local manufacture as a line-worker. Is that all I am capable of and are they even reading my resume?

    If there is anyone out there who can help please respond and as 1 talk-show host says everyday at the end of her show remember to "be king to one another".

  • My friend just told me (she was trying to be nice) that I'm limiting my career potential because I don't wear makeup to work. Do you think she's right? Do I need to wear makeup to be "professional?"

  • Because of the world we live in, I worry about choosing a hairstyle to wear in a professional workplace environment. Is there a good reference, website, article, etc. that gives practical advise?

  • Does anyone here work for Earnst & Young? I see their communications department is hiring for multiple roles I think I'm qualified for. I'd like to learn more "inside scoop" from a current or former employee. Also looking to learn more about how this department is structured so I can figure out which of the positions I should apply for. Don't want to apply for all of them and have it look as if I'm spamming them with my resume.

  • Any advice for someone searching for work during their first trimester of pregnancy? I currently work with a temp agency for income and am applying for my next role. From what I've read on the boards, it seems that most women are firmly established at their companies but I was forced to look for a new role outside of my former company due to a health condition. They were unwilling to move me to a different role within the company. Any suggestions on how to navigate the next 4-6 months before giving birth?

Find Out

What are women saying about your company?

Click Here

Share This

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Share with Friends
  • Share Anonymously

The Most Important Interview Step That Most Women Miss

The Most Important Interview Step That Most Women Miss

You researched the company, dressed the part, formed a sincere connection with your interviewer and nailed all the answers. Your mind is buzzing with exci...

You researched the company, dressed the part, formed a sincere connection with your interviewer and nailed all the answers. Your mind is buzzing with excitement imagining the future growth and unlimited potential awaiting you at this dream of a company.

Now, however, is not the time to daydream. There is a window of opportunity in the space between acing an interview and signing the dotted line that can have an important impact on the impression you make. The post-interview period is a chance to show the company that you are diligent in following up, a clear communicator, and yes, pretty freaking excited about the role!

Here are 5 tips on how to stand out after the interview.

1. Follow Up within 12 - 24 Hours

Wait at least 12 hours or until the following business day to send a follow up email. This shows the employer that you took time to reflect on your conversation, weighed the pros and cons, and are ready to move ahead with confidence and positive energy.

Waiting longer than 24 hours to follow up, however, suggests the position might not be a top priority or that the company is perhaps one of many potential job interests.

2. Keep your follow email direct and positive.

Most interviewers are busy employees and your interview is likely one of several tasks that they are handling at the moment. Increase your chances of receiving a response by writing a direct email expressing that you are excited about the role and that you’ve used the information provided to further think of ways that you can contribute to the company. This will also show that you’re a clear communicator and respect her inbox.

We provide a template and an example of post-interview emails below!

3. Track the Sector

Keep an eye on what’s happening in the sector either through a Tweetdeck column dedicated to the company and its competitors/collaborators or through email alerts.

If there’s any big news that happens in the days following the interview, you could Favorite a Tweet, Like a LinkedIn post, or even send a quick email congratulating the company on their newest acquisition or product launch. This shows that you are interested and active in the sector whether or not you take on this particular role.

4. Keep Your Options Open

Keep applying to jobs that spark your interest! There are many reasons why this particular opportunity might not work out so it is a great idea to always be applying. Researching the endless opportunities available to you will keep your energy high and spirits motivated, which will come through next time you speak with the interviewer.

You might even find a job better suited to you in this post-interview period. It’s important to remember that you are interviewing the company as much as they are interviewing you. You are a valuable asset to any company and your energy will communicate that.

5. Send a second follow up.

If you don’t hear back within 4-5 business days, send a second brief follow-up letting the company know that you are still excited about the opportunity and offer to send a brief sample of the work that you would be doing for the company.

What happens if you decide the job is not for you in this time? Send an appreciate quick note thanking the interviewer for her time, alerting her that you will not be taking the role and wish her the best of luck.

Below we provide a template and an example of post-interview emails that you can adapt to any role. Best of luck!

Follow Up Template:

Hi [interviewer or HR point person],

Thank you very much for taking the time to speak with me on [date]! I really enjoyed learning more about [company name]’s approach and workplace and am very excited about the potential to build [the primary topic or task you discussed.]

Our conversation really solidified my interest in the position. I am confident that I can hit the ground running and already brainstormed two ideas related to [a topic or task you discussed], which I’ve included below:

  • Brief idea #1 [One to two sentences max.]
  • Brief idea #2

Please let me know if you have any questions or I can provide any additional information at all. I can also be reached at (XXX) XXX-XXXX.

Thank you for your time and I look forward to hearing from you!

All the best,

Samantha

Follow Up Sample:

Hello Dominic,

I hope everything is going well. Thank you for connecting me with Jorge!

We had a great meeting this morning during which he showed me around the site and explained Company's goals in more detail. Our meeting solidified my interest in this project. The site looks beautiful and I think it has huge potential to grow.

I think it is a site that I can really hit the ground running with by writing news briefs and aggregating stories, but I'm also really excited by the opportunity to help build a trustworthy site and brand in all ways possible. My work in multiple newsrooms, both on the editorial and operations side, has provided some experiences that I think will be helpful moving forward.

Please let me know if you have any questions at all or I can provide any additional information. I can also be reached at (XXX) XXX-XXXX.

I look forward to hearing from you.

All the best,

Samantha

--

Samantha Shankman is a freelance business reporter and writer whose work has appeared in CNN, NBC, Travel & Leisure, Skift and Mic. She's also helped develop content for large brands including Bayer, Sakara Life, Sojern, and MindBodyGreen. You can follow her Twitter at @SamShankman and see more of her work at samanthashankman.com.

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women. 
Join us by reviewing your employer!



thumbnail 1 summary