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BY Fairygodboss

San Francisco's Paid Family Leave Law: A Bridge to the Rest of the Country?

San Francisco

Photo credit: Creative Commons

TAGS: Parental leave, Maternity leave, Paid leave

Yesterday, the city of San Francisco unanimously voted to pass the nation’s most generous family paid leave law. Beginning in 2017, all San Francisco employees of businesses with at least 50 employees will have access to 6 weeks of fully paid time-off for the purposes of care-taking for a newborn child, a newly adopted child, or a seriously ill family member.


Parents of both genders, as well as same-sex couples and adoptive parents are all eligible to receive this benefit. We’ve pulled together a summary of the most important facts and details we could find about the new city ordinance, below:

How will this parental leave be funded and how much will it cost?

This measure will be funded by a weekly payroll tax levied on San Francisco employees. San Francisco’s Office of Economic Analysis estimated that the ordinance could cost San Francisco businesses over $32 million per year if both men and women took advantage of the benefit.

To be clear, the San Francisco law requires employers fill the pay gap between what California state law already covers in terms of paid parental leave. California’s short-term disability insurance scheme pays for 55% of an employee’s time off after the birth or adoption of a child, or for care-taking of a sick family member (up to a cap, which has been set in 2016 to be $1,129).

What other protections does the law provide?

California’s state law doesn’t guarantee that the employer maintain an employee’s old job after they return from parental leave whereas the San Francisco provision makes it illegal to fire an employee after they return from their parental leave.

Eligibility and Details

To be eligible for the benefit, employees must have worked for an employer for at least 180 days for at least 8 hours per week, and spend at least 40% of their work week within the San Francisco city boundaries. As reported by ABC news, businesses will follow a phased-in schedule for compliance based on their size. Businesses with 50 employees will have to abide by the new rules in January 2017, while employers with 35-49 employees have until July 2017 and employers with between 20-34 employers will have to implement the law in 2018.

If the employee leaves within 90 days of returning from leave, they will have to pay back the benefit they received and employees must use all accrued vacation before receiving paid leave.

Next Steps

Although the San Francisco ordinance has not yet worked their way through the entire law-making process, legislators have described the rest of the process as a “formality” to the New York Times.

There’s certainly good reason for celebration on the California peninsula, and the city may be leading a trend that the rest of the country may begin embracing. Indeed, last week, New York State passed it’s own paid family leave law, which will become effective in 2018. As far as national law-making is concerned, however, some are not so sanguine. Scott Weiner, the legislator who introduced the proposal in San Francisco said, “
Whether it’s paid parental leave, infrastructure investment, minimum wage, paid sick leave or addressing carbon emissions, we know the states have to act.”

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Related Community Discussions

  • I recently got engaged, will be married October 2017. My fiance and I want to start a family right away. My job does not have paid maternity leave. Would it be premature for me to advocate for paid leave? My initial thought process was to figure this out as soon as possible. Maybe I should start looking for another job; researching other companies I noticed that most (all the one's that I saw) require employees to have been employed for a year before being offered paid maternity leave.

    If I could have my way I would stay where I am at and get paid leave.

    I have a positive relationship with my boss and can talk about this with him, however; he isn't the one who ultimately makes this decision, corporate does.

  • I am currently 36 weeks pregnant and gearing up to go on maternity leave at the end of the month. I recently came across a new job oppurnity that would be better for my family. I'm at the finishing stages of interviewing with this new company and I am worried that I will find out I got the job while on maternity leave. My question is, what happens to my maternity benefits and how do I go about leaving my current job without issue?

  • Any advice for someone searching for work during their first trimester of pregnancy? I currently work with a temp agency for income and am applying for my next role. From what I've read on the boards, it seems that most women are firmly established at their companies but I was forced to look for a new role outside of my former company due to a health condition. They were unwilling to move me to a different role within the company. Any suggestions on how to navigate the next 4-6 months before giving birth?

  • I'm 12 weeks pregnant and just met with HR to find out about our Maternity Leave program only to learn that they only give us unpaid leave (you have to file for state disability to get your 55% salary during those weeks) In talking with other moms, I found they all came back early (because who can really afford to take a big pay cut when you have a new little one to tend to?)

    It never occurred to me to check because kids weren't on the radar when I applied for the job, but I'm totally disheartened that my company that "prides itself" on caring about its people doesn't have something better in place. Has anyone gone to HR to see about improving their policies? I know as a whole our organization had a 12 year tenure when I started and a pretty high average age, so it may have not been on their radar, but I'm shocked that they aren't more progressive. Any advice??

  • Good morning!
    I am seriously stressing about tell my work I am pregnant. Right now I am 9 weeks and 3 days. I work in a very competitive industry (recruiting) just got promoted to Assistant Manager this year and the bosses are mostly men. Its a small business so you would think its family friendly but its not so much. I take on a huge work load and I know it will be upsetting to them (As happy as I am) I know there is nothing they can do legally but I am still scared. I am 38 years old, this is my first, have been at this small company for 8 years. Hard worker for sure so this will be unexpected. I know they do not have maternity leave here so we follow what the state offers. We get short term disability in New Jersey ( 4 weeks before, 6 after) and then I think we can take 6 weeks of FMLA. Now I know once I tell them they do ask what my plan is. I honestly have no idea what my plan is!! Do I need the 4 weeks before? After how long!

    Also, I am going on a preplanned vacation April 1-10, do I tell them when I get back or before I leave?

    Thank you in advance for ANY help, advice, I am quite stressed out!

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San Francisco's Paid Family Leave Law: A Bridge to the Rest of the Country?

San Francisco's Paid Family Leave Law: A Bridge to the Rest of the Country?

Yesterday, the city of San Francisco unanimously voted to pass the nation’s most generous family paid leave law. Beginning in 2017, all San Francisco...

Yesterday, the city of San Francisco unanimously voted to pass the nation’s most generous family paid leave law. Beginning in 2017, all San Francisco employees of businesses with at least 50 employees will have access to 6 weeks of fully paid time-off for the purposes of care-taking for a newborn child, a newly adopted child, or a seriously ill family member.


Parents of both genders, as well as same-sex couples and adoptive parents are all eligible to receive this benefit. We’ve pulled together a summary of the most important facts and details we could find about the new city ordinance, below:

How will this parental leave be funded and how much will it cost?

This measure will be funded by a weekly payroll tax levied on San Francisco employees. San Francisco’s Office of Economic Analysis estimated that the ordinance could cost San Francisco businesses over $32 million per year if both men and women took advantage of the benefit.

To be clear, the San Francisco law requires employers fill the pay gap between what California state law already covers in terms of paid parental leave. California’s short-term disability insurance scheme pays for 55% of an employee’s time off after the birth or adoption of a child, or for care-taking of a sick family member (up to a cap, which has been set in 2016 to be $1,129).

What other protections does the law provide?

California’s state law doesn’t guarantee that the employer maintain an employee’s old job after they return from parental leave whereas the San Francisco provision makes it illegal to fire an employee after they return from their parental leave.

Eligibility and Details

To be eligible for the benefit, employees must have worked for an employer for at least 180 days for at least 8 hours per week, and spend at least 40% of their work week within the San Francisco city boundaries. As reported by ABC news, businesses will follow a phased-in schedule for compliance based on their size. Businesses with 50 employees will have to abide by the new rules in January 2017, while employers with 35-49 employees have until July 2017 and employers with between 20-34 employers will have to implement the law in 2018.

If the employee leaves within 90 days of returning from leave, they will have to pay back the benefit they received and employees must use all accrued vacation before receiving paid leave.

Next Steps

Although the San Francisco ordinance has not yet worked their way through the entire law-making process, legislators have described the rest of the process as a “formality” to the New York Times.

There’s certainly good reason for celebration on the California peninsula, and the city may be leading a trend that the rest of the country may begin embracing. Indeed, last week, New York State passed it’s own paid family leave law, which will become effective in 2018. As far as national law-making is concerned, however, some are not so sanguine. Scott Weiner, the legislator who introduced the proposal in San Francisco said, “
Whether it’s paid parental leave, infrastructure investment, minimum wage, paid sick leave or addressing carbon emissions, we know the states have to act.”

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women.
Join us by reviewing your employer!
 

 

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