Zoe Kaplan
star-svg
6.51k
Staff Writer & Content Strategist @ Fairygodboss

LinkedIn’s green “Open to Work” banner has dressed up profiles of job seekers for over a year now. The profile picture frame gives those on the job hunt the opportunity to publicly signal their search to their network and recruiters.

On the one hand, the banner is an easy way to say you’re open to job opportunities without having to come right out and say it (or post it). On the other hand, it can put you in a tricky spot if you’re job searching while still on the job—even if you’re in a contract or freelance position.

The  “Open to Work” banner makes recruiters notice you…

“If you specify the types of job opportunities that you’re interested in and your preferred location, we’ll help your profile show up in search results when recruiters look for suitable job candidates,” LinkedIn’s Help page on the banner reads.

Recruiters on LinkedIn definitely follow suit. “As a Recruiter...the 'Open to Work' banner is so helpful and allows me to know who is open/ready to chat! I'll reach out when I see it!” recruiter Stephanie Pow wrote on LinkedIn.

Those who have used the banner have found that more recruiters reached out to them after adding it to their profile.

“Coming from someone who is currently using the banner, it has proven helpful in getting the word out,” job seeker Amy Parent wrote. “Anyone looking for a job in the current market needs to utilize every strategy/tool available to them to get the job that they desire/need.”

...but employers judge you.

For some employers, the “Open to Work” banner can look desperate. Others may assume the banner means you don’t currently have a job, and they may not want to hire someone who’s currently employed. 

One career coach believes the banner can lead to job opportunities, but it may have a harmful effect on the kinds of offers you get from a company.

“I don't believe that the Banner helps you leverage your value,” Career & Life Coach, LinkedIn Strategist and Fairygodboss VIP Melanie Mitchell-Wexler wrote. “It lowers your value to be able to negotiate a potentially higher salary because of the perception it sends. I don't care if you have no offers on the table but that one company needs to think you are the most highly sought-after candidate and they need to fight for you and offer you the best salary and benefits.”

So, when should you use it?

The “Open to Work” banner isn’t one size fits all, even though it’s made for job seekers. Your current employment status, what kind of opportunities you’re looking for, how quickly you’re looking for work and who you want to reach out to you can all affect whether or not you should include the banner in your profile.

If you plan on using recruiters to help you in your job search effort, the banner may be the way to go. But if you’re planning on applying and reaching out to companies all on your own, it may be best to skip the banner.

Do you think job seekers should use LinkedIn “Open to Work” banner? Share your answer in the comments to help other Fairygodboss'ers!

Share