Alex Wilson
star-svg
10

We love when women support other women, but support from our male coworkers, mentors, family members and friends is also incredibly important.

One of those male allies? The Man Who Has It All, an anonymously run Twitter account that highlights the ridiculous ways men talk about women. The account’s creator gender flips lifestyle advice for his 176,000 (and growing!) fans. He's even turned it into a hilarious book: “From Frazzled to Fabulous: How to Juggle a Successful Career, Fatherhood, ‘Me-Time’ and Looking Good.”

tweet

(Source: Twitter)

tweet

(Source: Twitter)

In an interview with The Huffington Post, the creator of @manwhohasitall said his goal was to reimagine the “crap” messaging from various publications and advertisements geared towards working mothers. That messaging is typically full of ridiculous stereotypes, and when it’s aimed at men instead of women — that ridiculousness is amplified.

Recently, @manwhohasitall started a new Twitter thread with a seemingly straightforward question:

tweet

(Source: Twitter)

Twitter users’ answers were, as expected, hilarious. Here's one of our favorite exchanges from the thread:

tweet

(Source: Twitter)

tweet

(Source: Twitter)

tweet

(Source: Twitter)

Another exchange did a particularly great job of highlighting issues that women in STEM face every day:

tweet

(Source: Twitter)

tweet

(Source: Twitter)

tweet

(Source: Twitter)

And this Twitter user used Donald Duck to drive her point home:

Tweet

(Source: Twitter)

Of course, it’s no secret that women are frequently excluded from the workplace, from mentoring opportunities and even from projects that they’re in charge of. According to a recent study by Heather Sarsons, a PhD candidate at Harvard University, when male and female academics collaborate on research, the male co-authors get more recognition and credit than their female peers. The result? Less upwards mobility for women at work.

“Remembering the journalistic cliché that one is an example, two is a coincidence, and three is a trend,” columnist Justin Wolfers wrote for The New York Times. “There’s a simple unconscious bias at work here.”

Maybe that’s why @manwhohasitall’s tweets resonate so much; their humor pinpoints the biases women deal with on an everyday level. Turning it towards men forces us to evaluate our perspectives — and that’s a good thing.

“Don’t get me wrong, I’m absolutely fine with dads who work,” the account creator said in character. “It boosts their self-esteem and gives them an identity beyond just ‘dad.’”