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Does anyone here work for Earnst & Young? I see their communications department is hiring for multiple roles I think I'm qualified for. I'd like to learn more "inside scoop" from a current or former employee. Also looking to learn more about how this department is structured so I can figure out which of the positions I should apply for. Don't want to apply for all of them and have it look as if I'm spamming them with my resume.

Tags: Job search, Networking
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Any advice for someone searching for work during their first trimester of pregnancy? I currently work with a temp agency for income and am applying for my next role. From what I've read on the boards, it seems that most women are firmly established at their companies but I was forced to look for a new role outside of my former company due to a health condition. They were unwilling to move me to a different role within the company. Any suggestions on how to navigate the next 4-6 months before giving birth?

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Tags: Job search, Maternity leave, Pregnancy
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I learned I was pregnant in August and was hired for a new full-time position at a school in November. I was not eligible for any pay beyond my accrued sick days during my leave and could only take 6 weeks off post-partum. but I gave birth at the end of April and only had to go back to school three weeks or so before having the summer home with my baby. From what I know, you have to be employed one year with a company before being eligible for the full 12 weeks FMLA.


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I am looking for a permanent role to have increased pay and education benefits but truly dread having a maternity leave discussion especially so early in my work life at an organization.


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Since you're at a temp agency, can you just stay on with your current employer? Or are you looking for a permanent role somewhere? Sadly, most employers require you're with them for at least a year before paid leave kicks in. If you're just looking for another temporary position, I think being a temp is actually great since nobody will be worried about your leaving to give birth in 4-6 months.


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The previous post is a hard act to follow, but here goes: Within a week or two, I will be laid off from the ad agency where I work. Unfortunately, this is a hazard of working at an agency. If the agency loses a major client (or, as in our case, two), staff are let go. For me, this is deja vu; at my last job, also at an agency, we lost a major client and 11 staffers were laid off (including me).

The advertising industry skews quite young. I laugh when I see a job posting for a "senior" copywriter requiring only three years of experience (I have more than 20).

While I am seeking a permanent, full-time position either remotely or in the Greater Philadelphia/South Jersey region, I am considering going freelance. I have had a freelance business on the side for decades, but never made the leap.

So, if anyone has advice on making a living as a freelancer, let me know. Or, if you have any ideas on how to "spin" my experience in a positive way, please share. (And if you want to send a job offer my way, that's OK, too!)

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Tags: Consulting, Job search, Networking
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Move to California, you need 3 years of experience and a master's degree to score a job that pays the bills period. You would fit right in here. Some of us are out of work because we have the opposite problem I'm one of them. I want to work in an office and to do something as simple as data entry or filing you need at least an associates and 2-3 years experience doing similar somewhere else. But yed most senior level jobs here want 7-10 years average. Hope you can find something though. Good luck.


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I think there are a lot of startups or smaller companies that are looking not to commit to to a full-time person -- that is how I built my base of clients as a new freelancer. I wasn't in the same field as you but I think startups are more flexible and don't care as much about the age of their consultants / freelancers. Freelancing does require you to hustle though! Good luck.


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I'm 12 weeks pregnant and just met with HR to find out about our Maternity Leave program only to learn that they only give us unpaid leave (you have to file for state disability to get your 55% salary during those weeks) In talking with other moms, I found they all came back early (because who can really afford to take a big pay cut when you have a new little one to tend to?)

It never occurred to me to check because kids weren't on the radar when I applied for the job, but I'm totally disheartened that my company that "prides itself" on caring about its people doesn't have something better in place. Has anyone gone to HR to see about improving their policies? I know as a whole our organization had a 12 year tenure when I started and a pretty high average age, so it may have not been on their radar, but I'm shocked that they aren't more progressive. Any advice??

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Tags: Maternity leave, Pregnancy, Working moms
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I recently went through the tedious search to find my employer's maternity leave. During this process I found that they give 6 weeks at 70% pay. I found it a punch in the gut since they also pride on being progressive with their benefits package. The year before they had done a benefits package survey to all employees, and they made changes that aligned with what their employees said they wanted (cell phone stipend, lower healthcare monthly costs, flexible work schedules). The problem I see in this is that while we are 20k employees, the amount of women that are of child bearing age are probably not high (or don't want kids or had kids before joining and no longer need the benefit) and therefore didn't request it. The other major fault with the surgery was it didn't pose questions about maternity leave, you could write it in but as in your case it wasn't on people's radar). End result, there were no changes to the leave policy because it wasn't an item the employees wanted. Because of this, I have started to look for new employment and would cite this a hundred times over to HR and my management upon leaving.


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All women should read the amazing negotiation advice in the book, "Women in Tech: Take your Career to the Next Level" by Tarah Wheeler. I applied the advice in a recent negotiation round and got a 15% bump in salary!

Anybody have good advice for how to request a raise that's worked?

Great article here: "http://www.geekwire.com/2016/book-excerpt-4-negotiating-tactics/"

Tags: Diversity, Negotiating
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My company does not offer fertility benefits, and I'm trying to make the case to management that they should - in order to be competitive. (I'm not in HR.) Has anyone had any experience with this? Any best practices to share?

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Tags: Diversity, Pregnancy

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Many companies don't offer fertility benefits because doing so causes their health insurance premiums to go up significantly and the benefit most health insurance carriers offer is simply not worth it. The benefit might be 50% of costs covered up to a maximum lifetime benefit of $10,000 but the company ends up paying thousands of dollars in premiums for this "benefit".


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I am highly skilled with a background in marketing management (MBA in Finace and Marketing), process improvement (Six Sigma), project management and research. I have been ranked number 3 in quality performance and recognized by a CEO for my innovativeness. I have taken serval (3) years off from the corporate environment to take care a relative that has significant chronic medical issues. I am ready to go back to work, but I have contraint. I want to be available - so I do not want to travel more than 20%. I do not want to work extreme hours - I want a balanced life. I am trying to relocate to the Raleigh/Durham area in North Carolina, so that I can oversee my relative's care, but I realize that this may not be possible.

Watching this health crisis unfold has taught me that I do not need to make 6 figures. I want work that makes a difference and pays well. I am not a spring chicken (59 years olds). I documents that show the quality of my work.

Where do I find a company that will provide the mental stimulation and flexibility. I like to think, solve hard problem and significantly change companies in positive way. I like the think tank environment.

How do I search for and find a good fit?

Tags: Career advice, Job search, Work-life balance
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Hi Fairygodbosses! I am writing here on behalf of my mom because I love and want the best for her. She has been working at a non-profit for the last 9 years and has become miserable at work. She wants a career change but doesn't know what she wants to do or how to get there. She is only now making the salary she should be making at 58 years old and I think that holds her back from taking a chance and leaving her company. Do any fairy godbosses here have some advice or resources for a middle-aged woman looking for a career change (and feels like a life change)? How can my mom build her confidence and self-worth to go after what truly makes her happy (or at least start trying to figure it out?) Appreciate any of your thoughts.

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Tags: Career advice, Career change, Working moms
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I would recommend that she put her resume together and then, perhaps, speak with a resume building professional. I think for a lot of people putting themselves out there after being in the same position for a long time is truly difficult. If she sat down with someone who could help her with her resume, she would be able to better focus on what she has to offer, how to properly word those skills, and make herself very marketable to a future employer.

If she likes her current salary, she should take her time in finding a new position, but she has to start looking. The right career will come her way!


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Your mom sounds amazing! It sounds like she should definitely explore a career change. Like any other career changers, I would strongly suggest that she start networking before making any type of formal change. Since she is at a not-for-profit, there may be some strong connections within range - for example, board members or large donors. Mostly, I think you should try to build up her confidence as much as possible! That will matter. Good luck!


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Good morning!
I am seriously stressing about tell my work I am pregnant. Right now I am 9 weeks and 3 days. I work in a very competitive industry (recruiting) just got promoted to Assistant Manager this year and the bosses are mostly men. Its a small business so you would think its family friendly but its not so much. I take on a huge work load and I know it will be upsetting to them (As happy as I am) I know there is nothing they can do legally but I am still scared. I am 38 years old, this is my first, have been at this small company for 8 years. Hard worker for sure so this will be unexpected. I know they do not have maternity leave here so we follow what the state offers. We get short term disability in New Jersey ( 4 weeks before, 6 after) and then I think we can take 6 weeks of FMLA. Now I know once I tell them they do ask what my plan is. I honestly have no idea what my plan is!! Do I need the 4 weeks before? After how long!

Also, I am going on a preplanned vacation April 1-10, do I tell them when I get back or before I leave?

Thank you in advance for ANY help, advice, I am quite stressed out!

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Tags: Human resources, Maternity leave, Pregnancy
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I waited until I was 6 months pregnant. I was told to wait until my review happened, it never happened. I work in HR and wanted so much to tell my team and could not. When I finally told my boss she thought I was resigning. I would do what the other person suggested. Go in with a plan. This is what is coming up, this is how I am going to handle it. And also make sure you are the ones telling your peers. It was nice to finally be able to rub my belly and not have to be worried about getting caught.
Re the NJ laws. Look on the NJ website. There are both a Federal and State program in play, paid and unpaid leave. Read up on it and if you have an HR person go to them. They can explain the policies on how it works.


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The Broad Experience Podcast just released an episode that addressed planning to leave. I suggest giving it a listen- it had a ton of great advice that I cannot rewrite here to the same effect. Basically, plan for your time out in conjunction with your supervisor. That will help give him confidence that you are invested and help make the transition out and back easier. Best!


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Congrats on your pregnancy!
I'm so sorry that you feel this way; it is so unfortunate that after so much time at the company that you don't feel comfortable with such an exciting thing.
I'd recommend going on vacation; wait until you pass at least the 12 week mark to tell them anyway. It is too early in the pregnancy to make that plan. You have no legal obligation to tell them that you are pregnant by a certain date so I'd recommend letting the feelings move around a bit, be excited about your pregnancy. Brainstorm a few ways to bring it up with your manager (or whoever) and then figure out the one you like best.
I really hope that your company responds with support and excitement!


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First of all, I just think it's so wrong that women feel so stressed about telling work they're pregnant -- and we all always do. I will say that for most people, it goes much better than what you would expect. I think you should wait until after your vacation. You are early to be telling. I waited till 17 weeks to get the results of my amnio screening anyway. I know women who have hid it until they just couldn't any more -- like 20 weeks ++. Any you have every right to do that!

When you go to tell them you're pregnant, come prepared with a plan of how you propose to handle your work while you are out. It will make everyone feel like this doesn't add another item to their to-do list.


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What is the proper etiquette on your first day back from maternity leave? Do you bring a small gift (e.g. box of joe or box of cookies?) I had 2 people covered for me while I'm on a 5 months leave. I would like to show them my gratitude for their additional work. What do you suggest I bring and do I bring it for the whole office of just the 2 people? Or would you bring anything at all?

Tags: Maternity leave
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I would offer to buy them lunch your first week back! That way you can catch up and avoid gift awkwardness in front of others. I would not treat the whole office. You aren't the first woman to have a child and you won't be the last so its not necessary to treat the whole office. I don't mean that in a way to discount your milestone (congrats btw!) but I am trying to highlight how to a company, it happens and it will happen again. I would focus on the people who supported you, such as the two coworkers you mentioned.


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