discussion boards

  • Pumping at work. All my office has to offer is a small closet with a task chair thrown in there for nursing mothers. Has anyone else experienced a similar situation and how did you handle it?

    1
    3
    Tags: Pumping At Work
    user image

    I have! When I started at my office, the pumping room was a shared space with a shower and toiletry shelf for women who worked out before work or at lunch. It was NASTY. I'm talking people would leave hair brushes covered in hair and curling irons out. Tons of dried hair spray every where. Toothbrush without a cover, and extremely dim lighting because the bulb burnt out and no one bothered to fix it. It never appeared like it was cleaned on a regular basis. It was also right off of the bathroom so I could hear/smell people when they'd use it. I spoke to HR and when she reached a dead end, I involved the office manager and even the janitor! Fortunately all three were moms themselves and became very passionate about my cause. I'd recommend using your internal network to try and start the discussion. Google photos of nursing rooms and show them examples from other companies. Remind your HR group or your boss (if you have that kind of relationship) about the laws in your state. Talk to other moms in your office. There were 2 others pumping at the same time as me and one pregnant woman who planned to pump - we were louder in numbers! Good luck :)

    user image

    I was expected to use my office (because it has a door), but it also has windows (to the hallway, and outside). I brought curtains to cover the windows and made the best of it. i could have requested a space, but it would have been similar to your situation, so I just made my office more comfortable. If your office is not very big, or there are not many (any) other nursing mothers, I would try to make the space more comfortable. If there is a manager or decision maker you are comfortable with, I would recommend going to them to at least ask for a more comfortable chair.

  • A male peer keeps interrupting me in meetings. It's driving me crazy. Should I say something to him?

    1
    1
    Tags: Colleagues, Discrimination, Inappropriate situation
    user image

    You should probably ask him to lunch and try to get him to be an advocate for you. If he thinks he's helping you, he'll be less apt to step on you. It sounds annoying - - but it will probably have a better outcome than just calling him on it.

  • Is self-employment a good idea to merge my business with a corporate company as an experienced businesswoman going in the healthcare industry?

    1
    0
    Tags: Flexible working
  • I have to travel to China and I'm currently breastfeeding. What is the best way to deal with it? Should I just pumpo and dump? Is it even feasible to ship back the breastmilk?

    0
    3
    Tags: Pumping At Work
    user image

    Personally I had a really hard time doing the dumping thing....I didn't ship it back but I did carry it back with me in my luggage with plenty of ice...are you flying business? When my ice packs started melting, I found it pretty helpful to get ice from the plane crew....and during the trip itself I kept my breastmilk in the hotel fridge / freezer...

    user image

    Check out the company milk stork. Your employer may cover it

  • Our lactation room is so far away from where I sit that it takes me like 10 minutes to get there. It's hard enough to step away from work to pump, but this makes every trip to pump 20 minutes longer. What should I do?

    0
    2
    Tags: Pumping At Work
    user image

    That is not acceptable - and it's even illegal in NY State. Tell your HR department and commandeer another space. I used a visitor office near my desk.

  • I'm pretty sure that the men who sit around the lactation room can hear me when I pump. I don't really care, but should I? Is it in bad form? And why can't someone invent a quieter pump?

    1
    3
    Tags:
    user image

    Don't worry about it - you already have so much to worry about as a new working mom! The truth is that they probably would know what you're doing in there anyway and while yes, it would be nice if someone invented a quieter pump, it's something that just sucks. Some people eat loudly, others talk too loudly on the phone, etc...I understand why you're embarrassed but don't be!

  • I had to stop breastfeeding my baby after 6 months because it was so hard for me to pump at work. Between a difficult manager, bad lactation facilities, and a heavy travel schedule, my milk dried up. I feel so sad -- like I've already let my baby down.

    0
    4
    Tags: Pregnancy at Work, Pumping At Work
    user image

    Don't be so hard on yourself!! You did your best and remember, in a few years your healthy toddler (and you) will probably think of htis time as a distant memory. That doesn't feel like much consolation now but trust me, it does get easier and the fact that you care so much means you're not letting your baby down

    user image

    I had a similar experience. Pumping is just the worst. And that bag is so heavy.

  • Is it common to have to fill out a horribly-formatted Word document form when applying for design positions? And, designers, how do you resist rebuilding the forms? -_^

    0
    0
    Tags: Job search, Other
    user image

    No, it is not common, as most companies know that the portfolio is a better indication of a designer's ability than a form. Hard to resist reformatting, but I would fill out the form to the best of my ability, to show that in addition to my design skills, I also have excellent communication skills. It will come through even in a badly-designed document.

  • I am interviewing for a new job. Should I reveal that I have a 20-month old at home? Or is it better to keep it to myself until after the process?

    1
    9
    Tags: Flexible working, Interview, Job search
    user image

    Technically, you don't have to tell them and they can't ask you about it. Personally, I am very open during interviews (whether I'm the interviewer or interviewee) because I believe that trust is built from the very first contact, not until you get an offer. Having said this, doors may be closed but, think about it, do you really want to work for a company that would rather you didn't have a kid and suck the life out of you? A company that wouldn't understand that little ones get sick, nanny's bail or day care closes and you have to stay home?
    If you are lucky and interviewing with a company that truly values its employees and encourages a balanced lifestyle, you may even be able to negotiate flexible work hours or what not if you mention it.

    Its your decision and whether the job security is taking a higher priority than corporate culture and values. Hope this helps you and good luck!

  • I'm in wealth management and it's been a good run so far -- but lately my practice has started to lose clients. They are saying that managed money is not performing nearly as well as index funds. Should I be looking for a new profession?

    1
    0
    Tags: Wealth Management

Post an Article