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BY Anna Anisin via SharpHeels

6 Tips Everyone Can Practice to Be Healthier While Managing a Crazy Work Schedule 

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Photo credit: Pixabay

TAGS: Health, Work-life balance, Productivity

Many people work very long and grueling hours. A hectic work schedule can set a person back in terms of health and well-being. Staying healthy while working a hefty amount of hours will not only help improve job productivity, but it might prevent serious health problems from forming down the road. The following tips are designed to provide some easy-to-try tactics that when combined with one another, can maintain, and for some, improve health.

Practice Good Posture

Often, you will be sitting at your desk in some form of upright chair, or you will be moving from an office to a conference room and then to another room for a meeting. In each setting, you will likely be sitting in a chair. Incorrect posture while sitting stresses ligaments. If your spine is under persistent stress for an accumulated period of time, you likely will experience back problems in the future. Try to sit with a straight back, and, most importantly, do not let your shoulders slouch forward. Keep your shoulders back, and at the same time, try to keep feet flat on the floor.

Stand Up Often

If you commute to work on a train or bus, split sitting and standing time. Sitting the entire train or bus ride adds to your overall daily sitting time. Today in the United States and Western Europe, most jobs are service-based. The service economy necessitates that the majority of the workforce spend time in an office-based setting. The amount that we sit during our work time has arguably exceeded a healthy threshold. If you want to maintain good health while working an intense schedule, take every opportunity to stand up and move around.

Keep Coffee Pure and Small

Popular coffee stops along the way to work have menus that are diverse and colorful, but many things on the menu are comprised of a number of ingredients that are added to coffee. These most often include sugar, milk, soy milk, and different types of syrup. Not only do ingredients of this sort tally up a high number of calories, they also require the body to process them like food. They also add to the overall size of the beverage. When getting coffee before or during work, order a smaller size with fewer additives. This way you will still reap the energetic benefits of caffeine without needing to worry about calories and a blood-sugar spike.

Cut Out Unnecessary Sugar

Around ten percent of the U.S. population – nearly 32 million people – has one of the two forms of diabetes. Diabetes, along with other serious metabolic disorders, is very much influenced by excessive sugar intake. Scientific research has revealed that sugary drinks may cause people to develop type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association has recommended that people limit intake of sugary drinks. This does not mean cutting out only soda, which many have already done. Fruit juices, sweetened coffee, and tea with sugar all should be avoided or consumed in extreme moderation.

Eat a Low-Carb Lunch

Sugary drinks are not the only potential health-hazard to be avoided during hectic work schedules. A carb-loaded lunch is also not recommended. Meals that include burritos, sandwiches, french fries, hamburgers, or pasta can cause blood sugar to spike. You will feel satisfied and full, but just one hour later, you may feel sluggish and want to take a nap. Eating a salad, steak, eggs, cheese, or vegan/soy sausages will provide the energy needed until dinner, and more importantly, they will keep blood sugar stable and include a high level of protein.

Big Dinner, Sleep Like a Winner

Americans don’t get enough sleep. This is the source of many of health problems. Part of the reason for the lack of sleep is crazy work schedules. One of the worst things that can happen in the middle of a hectic work week is waking up feeling like you did not get enough sleep. This can raise stress levels and cause anxiety because you might feel as if you potentially will not be at your best when called upon to perform. After going through the day without over consuming sugar and after eating a low-carb lunch, enjoy a nice dinner. The dinner should be wholesome in the sense of containing an adequate amount of fat, carbs, and protein. You will feel rewarded for your low-sugar obedience, and you’ll also feel full.

This article was originally published on SharpHeels.

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Related Community Discussions

  • I need some advice. I recently took maternity leave, which ended up turning in to Temporary Disability Leave because of some medical complications I had after the baby was delivered. I returned back to work after being off for 24 weeks. I have returned to the same job and have tried to get back into the swing of corporate life + new baby (first time mom here) and have the opportunity to take an additional 4 weeks off paid by the state, but it needs to be taken and completed before my child turns 12 months old and that's fast approaching.

    I submitted a request to HR to take temporary leave of absence and my HR department is denying me the ability to take this leave, stating that I exhausted the 13 weeks FMLA that the company offers (has to offer) to all employees. They are saying that I don't qualify for this leave until a full 12 months after my initial leave started. Everything I have read online and everyone I have talked to say that FMLA and TCI leave are completely different and separate. Technically, I think I am allowed to take this leave, the State says I qualify for it, but it's now in my employers hands and I am afraid if they deny me, and I choose to still take the leave, that I will not have job security. The brochure talking about TCI doesn't say anything about FMLA being the deciding factor "http://www.dlt.ri.gov/tdi/pdf/TCIBrochure.pdf."

    Does anyone know what my rights are? Can I legally take the 4 weeks off, and still have a job to return back to? Given that I had to take so much time off, do I still qualify for job protection and benefits?

    Thank you for any an all help.

  • I am highly skilled with a background in marketing management (MBA in Finace and Marketing), process improvement (Six Sigma), project management and research. I have been ranked number 3 in quality performance and recognized by a CEO for my innovativeness. I have taken serval (3) years off from the corporate environment to take care a relative that has significant chronic medical issues. I am ready to go back to work, but I have contraint. I want to be available - so I do not want to travel more than 20%. I do not want to work extreme hours - I want a balanced life. I am trying to relocate to the Raleigh/Durham area in North Carolina, so that I can oversee my relative's care, but I realize that this may not be possible.

    Watching this health crisis unfold has taught me that I do not need to make 6 figures. I want work that makes a difference and pays well. I am not a spring chicken (59 years olds). I documents that show the quality of my work.

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  • Just to be totally honest: I am the breadwinner in my marriage. I feel like sometimes it causes a lot of friction. I also feel resentful because my husband still wants to be the main decision maker about family/household issues. Does anyone else have the same issues?

  • I'm a new mom, and I am feeling a lot of pressure to attend an "optional" holiday team dinner. I will not be allowed to have my cell phone on me. My DH will most likely be working late due to year-end preparations at his company, and my MIL has never watched my baby for that long. She also doesn't speak English, so if she calls the restaurant for an emergency, I'm worried it won't get to me. I am extremely uncomfortable attending this dinner, but feel that if I do not attend, there will be backlash. What do I do?

  • I'm getting ready to come back from maternity leave, and one of the senior female partners just pulled me aside and told me I should expect to travel more when I get back! I'm already having a tough time with going back to work, and now I'm just feeling sick. Any advice?

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6 Tips Everyone Can Practice to Be Healthier While Managing a Crazy Work Schedule 

6 Tips Everyone Can Practice to Be Healthier While Managing a Crazy Work Schedule 

Many people work very long and grueling hours. A hectic work schedule can set a person back in terms of health and well-being. Staying healthy while workin...

Many people work very long and grueling hours. A hectic work schedule can set a person back in terms of health and well-being. Staying healthy while working a hefty amount of hours will not only help improve job productivity, but it might prevent serious health problems from forming down the road. The following tips are designed to provide some easy-to-try tactics that when combined with one another, can maintain, and for some, improve health.

Practice Good Posture

Often, you will be sitting at your desk in some form of upright chair, or you will be moving from an office to a conference room and then to another room for a meeting. In each setting, you will likely be sitting in a chair. Incorrect posture while sitting stresses ligaments. If your spine is under persistent stress for an accumulated period of time, you likely will experience back problems in the future. Try to sit with a straight back, and, most importantly, do not let your shoulders slouch forward. Keep your shoulders back, and at the same time, try to keep feet flat on the floor.

Stand Up Often

If you commute to work on a train or bus, split sitting and standing time. Sitting the entire train or bus ride adds to your overall daily sitting time. Today in the United States and Western Europe, most jobs are service-based. The service economy necessitates that the majority of the workforce spend time in an office-based setting. The amount that we sit during our work time has arguably exceeded a healthy threshold. If you want to maintain good health while working an intense schedule, take every opportunity to stand up and move around.

Keep Coffee Pure and Small

Popular coffee stops along the way to work have menus that are diverse and colorful, but many things on the menu are comprised of a number of ingredients that are added to coffee. These most often include sugar, milk, soy milk, and different types of syrup. Not only do ingredients of this sort tally up a high number of calories, they also require the body to process them like food. They also add to the overall size of the beverage. When getting coffee before or during work, order a smaller size with fewer additives. This way you will still reap the energetic benefits of caffeine without needing to worry about calories and a blood-sugar spike.

Cut Out Unnecessary Sugar

Around ten percent of the U.S. population – nearly 32 million people – has one of the two forms of diabetes. Diabetes, along with other serious metabolic disorders, is very much influenced by excessive sugar intake. Scientific research has revealed that sugary drinks may cause people to develop type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association has recommended that people limit intake of sugary drinks. This does not mean cutting out only soda, which many have already done. Fruit juices, sweetened coffee, and tea with sugar all should be avoided or consumed in extreme moderation.

Eat a Low-Carb Lunch

Sugary drinks are not the only potential health-hazard to be avoided during hectic work schedules. A carb-loaded lunch is also not recommended. Meals that include burritos, sandwiches, french fries, hamburgers, or pasta can cause blood sugar to spike. You will feel satisfied and full, but just one hour later, you may feel sluggish and want to take a nap. Eating a salad, steak, eggs, cheese, or vegan/soy sausages will provide the energy needed until dinner, and more importantly, they will keep blood sugar stable and include a high level of protein.

Big Dinner, Sleep Like a Winner

Americans don’t get enough sleep. This is the source of many of health problems. Part of the reason for the lack of sleep is crazy work schedules. One of the worst things that can happen in the middle of a hectic work week is waking up feeling like you did not get enough sleep. This can raise stress levels and cause anxiety because you might feel as if you potentially will not be at your best when called upon to perform. After going through the day without over consuming sugar and after eating a low-carb lunch, enjoy a nice dinner. The dinner should be wholesome in the sense of containing an adequate amount of fat, carbs, and protein. You will feel rewarded for your low-sugar obedience, and you’ll also feel full.

This article was originally published on SharpHeels.

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women. 
Join us by reviewing your employer!

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