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BY Fairygodboss

Childcare Costs Are Sidelining Women in the Workforce

Photo credit: USDAgov / Foter / CC BY

TAGS: Childcare, Women in the workplace, Working moms

We all know that childcare isn't cheap. But a few stories this week put in perspective just how expensive it is to have children.

The worst impact is on those making minimum wage salaries, but even middle-class families are affected, as this personal story reveals. There are large costs to society, as well.

For many families, childcare means that one parent -- usually the woman -- drops out of the workforce entirely. The labor force participation rates for women may continue to decline so long if there is no policy or market-place based solution to this problem.

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women.
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Childcare Costs Are Sidelining Women in the Workforce

Childcare Costs Are Sidelining Women in the Workforce

We all know that childcare isn't cheap. But a few stories this week put in perspective just how expensive it is to have children. The worst impact is on ...

We all know that childcare isn't cheap. But a few stories this week put in perspective just how expensive it is to have children.

The worst impact is on those making minimum wage salaries, but even middle-class families are affected, as this personal story reveals. There are large costs to society, as well.

For many families, childcare means that one parent -- usually the woman -- drops out of the workforce entirely. The labor force participation rates for women may continue to decline so long if there is no policy or market-place based solution to this problem.

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women.
Join us by reviewing your employer!
 

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