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Couple Wants to Make Lying about Childcare Experience a Crime | Fairygodboss
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Editorial
Couple Whose Kids Were Murdered Wants to Make Lying about Childcare Experience a Crime
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Nicole Sheinzok via Working Mother
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On October 25, 2012, Kevin and Marina Krim's young son and daughter were murdered by their nanny, Yoselyn Ortega. Now, almost eight years later, the couple is supporting a law that would make it criminal to provide fake references for nannies or babysitters, so families looking for childcare never have to go through what they did.

As CBS New York reports, Kevin and Marina were led to believe Ortega would be a good nanny, since Ortega's sister told them she had childcare experience and a positive reference from a previous employer. However, during trial, it was revealed that Ortega never had any experience as a nanny, and her employer reference actually came from her niece. Unfortunately, this lie cost Kevin and Marina the lives of their two children. Under LuLu and Leo's Law, named after the couple's two children, people who lie about a person's childcare experience could face jail time.

In a Facebook post, Kevin explained why he was backing the law, writing, “We also believe that parents and caregivers should be protected from people who would harm them with their evil and lies. We were deceived and betrayed by the defendant’s family, who remain wholly unaccountable for their role in the murders of our children."

Just yesterday, the couple's former nanny was convicted of killing their two kids and was sentenced to life in prison without parole. Throughout the trial, Ortega's attorney tried to present Ortega as someone who committed the heinous act because she suffered from a mental illness, the Washington Post reports. However, the prosecution argued that Ortega's behavior never indicated she had any form of mental illness, and instead, acted out of spite because she didn't get along with her employers.

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This article originally appeared on Working Mother.
 
Working Mother is mentor, role model and advocate for the country’s more than 17 million moms who are devoted to their families and committed to their careers. Through our website, magazine, research, radio and powerful events, Working Mother provides its readers with the community, solutions and strategies they need to thrive. 
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