How to find remote jobs: 31 Places to Look

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Do you dream of waking up to a commute that involves walking over to your laptop in your pajamas? It isn’t everyone’s cup of tea, but for some people there’s nothing more attractive than the idea that you can control where and how you work (not to mention being within a stone’s throw of your kitchen coffee maker!)

If you’re one of these people, you may be wondering, “Do good remote jobs really exist?” It’s hard to give a generic answer to that question because what any individual is looking for can be so personal and specific. However, we wholeheartedly believe there is little harm in checking out your options — even if you’re just curious — and have compiled a list of 30 places job-seekers can turn to for remote jobs. With so many job boards out there, we’ve focused on those sites that either offer 100% remote positions or that allow you search and filter for remote jobs on their sites.

How many people work remotely?

Working remotely is more common than you think. There’s been a steady increase in the number of remote positions available in the world in the past 20 years. According to a recent Gallup poll on telecommuting, more than 1/3 of U.S. workers (37%) say they have telecommuted in their jobs (up from 9% in 1995). On the other hand, the definition of what counts as remote work may not be what you may think. For example, the same 2015 Gallup poll suggests that the average telecommuting employee only worked remotely an average of 2.3 days per month.

Also, the distribution of remote jobs is very specific. White collar professionals tend to be the main beneficiaries of remote work opportunities since technology is one of the forces driving remote work. The ubiquity of computers, phones and internet access has enabled workers to be digitally connected to colleagues and clients anywhere they go. This benefits some job roles more than others. For examples customer service telephone representatives can more easily work remotely than a nurse (though telephone nurse services and hotlines do exist). Technology is changing many industries, so you may be surprised at the kinds of digital work and remote jobs that are available.

Finally, we should mention that the freelancer or “gig” economy is driving a lot of remote job opportunities. If you’re happy being a freelancer or independent contractor, there’s probably never been a better time in terms of job and project opportunities. The downside is that you may have to be willing to forego full-time employee status and it’s accompanying benefits such as a 401k, or employer-provided healthcare insurance. In other words, great remote jobs can often mean accepting the pros and cons of being a freelancer or independent contractor.

31 Places to Find Remote Work

With all the caveats and context out of the way, we’re now happy to introduce a round up 31 great websites where you can look for remote jobs. Depending on your skills and industry, some may be well worth exploring!

  • 99Designs - 99 Designs is a great place to find project-based work or meet clients who are interested in your graphic design skills. If you’re a creative type, and happy to work on a freelance basis designing logos, mobile apps or websites, you can find project work and meet longer-term clients as an independent contractor on this site.

  • Authentic Jobs - This job board is focused on creative types with skills in graphic design, UX or front-end web development. Though they have a range of jobs from contract and temporary positions to full-time roles, you can search and filter for remote positions only.

  • Axiom Law - Axiom is a digital law firm in the sense that attorneys in their network work either on site at a client, remotely (or in some combination of the two). It is a way for attorneys who are looking for an alternative to going into a traditional law firm to practice. Some attorneys are staffed on a long-term basis to the same client(s) while others appear to work on discrete projects.

  • Business Talent Group - Business Talent Group bills itself as a marketplace for high-level professional consultants to meet top employers such as corporations and private equity firms looking for senior-level hires on a project basis. They boast an impressive clientele list and may be a good fit for you if you’re an executive-level professional looking to work as an independent contractor.

  • CloudPeeps - CloudPeeps is a freelancer and independent contractor community focused predominantly on content creators, community builders, marketers and and social media types. Hourly gigs range from $30/hour to $150/hour and are based on rates that freelancers set for their own work. Monthly gigs and projects are also available.

  • Fiverr - As the name of the company implies, gigs listed on Fiverr all start at $5 (USD). Fiverr calls them services (rather than projects) and each freelancer in this community lists specific projects they are willing to complete. Sometimes the services cost more than $5 but the initial “test service” is only $5. The services on Fiverr are wide-ranging and can be eclectic, ranging from writing you a powerpoint presentation and proofreading up to 1,000 words, to creating a custom rap song to doing a celebrity impersonation for a video. At this price point, this site may be best suited to those looking for small amounts of supplemental income.

  • Freelancer - With an impressive international reach and focused on the small business marketplace, Freelancer brings together millions of employers and freelancers to work on projects such as data entry, writing, design, accounting and website development. Job seekers can find fixed price projects, hourly projects or bid and participate in contests that have been established by employers.

  • Freelancermap - This marketplace brings together millions of professionals and projects together, with the average project paying $200. They focus on many different kinds of work, including logo and graphic design, market research, telemarketing, translation work, data entry and administrative work such as typesetting and powerpoint presentation assembly.

  • FlexJobs - This site gets their employees involved in curating the job postings, which you can only access by paying a membership subscription. The benefit of doing so is that you are assured that the job listings are not stale, and vetted by a human being that’s checked to ensure that a role is truly a “flexible” and/or remote. Notably, there are plenty of full-time and part-time roles here, not just freelancer positions.

  • GrowthGeeks - This marketplace is focused on growing businesses and start-ups that are interested in hiring independent contractors to work on specific “gigs”. While there are many different kinds of gigs listed on GrowthGeeks, much of the work listed here seem to focus on helping companies grow their social media presence, email lists and related marketing projects.

  • Guru - Guru is a freelancer marketplace with a concentration of services in the web development, IT and web design space. Writing and translation services are also extremely prevalent throughout the site. All the gigs listed here are 100% remote.

  • Jobspresso - Jobspresso’s jobs are hand selected and focused on software developers and creative professionals. Many of their employers list full and part-time roles and are brand name companies in the tech industry (e.g. Microsoft and Amazon, just to list a few when we took a look).

  • Maven - Maven describes itself as a “microconsulting platform” where job seekers set an hourly rate, describe their experience and areas of expertise and should appeal to those with specific and strong knowledge domains. The work here is on a project basis, and may be most suitable for independent contractors though it appears some Mavens are supplementing their employee income on this platform.

  • Maybrooks - Focused on moms who are interested in flexible jobs, Maybrooks’ jobs appear to be a combination of freelance/contract, full-time flex or part-time roles at media, start-up and tech industries. 

  • Mechanical Turk - The grand-daddy of administrative and data-entry tasks, Amazon’s platform connects workers interested in “Human Intelligence Tasks” (HITs) with employers interested fulfilling projects with in a global 24x7, remote contract workforce. 

  • PowertoFly - Focused on helping women find remote work, PowertoFly connects female developers and technical talent with employers who are interested in improving their gender diversity and have remote jobs. Many positions are full-time, though we saw plenty of part-time and project listings on their site as well.

  • Peopleforce - Peopleforce calls itself an enterprise crowdsourcing platform, and works on a transaction basis to connect employers with an army of people with data entry, data cleaning, tagging, and research skills. Employers in sectors ranging from publishing, financial services and manufacturing all seem to need freelancers with these administrative data-oriented skills.

  • ProBlogger - If you’re a writer interested in blogging for a company or employer blog, ProBlogger has a job board designed for you. They list jobs from employers who are interested in finding writers who will produce blog content on a regular basis, as well as consult on their blog, design a blog or set up a blog for them. While these roles are not always explicitly labeled “remote”, most writing positions can offer that flexibility.

  • Proonto - Staffed with customer service and product experts, Proonto is a platform connecting sales and customer support associates with employers looking for remote assistance on their online chat modules. The service may be a good fit if you’re looking to interact and help e-commerce shoppers.

  • Remote OK - With a heavy emphasis on technical and software development jobs in the start-up and technology industry, there is even a section to look for jobs within the category of “remote startups.” If you’re interested in looking by coding language, their job search interface makes that a cinch.

  • Remote Working - All roles listed on Remote Working’s site appear to be full-time remote positions. The jobs range from software development positions to social media and marketing roles. The employers appear to largely start-ups and smaller firms in the tech industry.

  • Remotive - We were impressed by their listing of remote jobs and saw an emphasis on tech and product positions at smaller tech firms and start-ups on Remotive’s site. All jobs listed on Remotive appear to be full-time, remote positions and they have a bi-monthly newsletter that focuses on the issues and topics around remote working.

  • SkillBridge - Skillbridge calls itself the “Home of the Elite Business Freelancer or Consultant” and makes an effort to highlight the qualifications and educational backgrounds of the consultants, MBAs, and impressive resumes of the people in it’s network. All work is done on a project basis on this site and employers on the site appear to be top-tier firms or investment funds.

  • SkiptheDrive - SkipThe Drive is a free site for job seekers, requiring no user registration and only lists telecommuting and remote jobs (full and part-time). They also provide a list of their favorite telecommuting companies (which includes many large corporates) and a telecommuting calculator to help you understand how much remote working may save you!

  • Stack Overflow Careers 2.0 - Stack Overflow is a huge developer community filled with crowdsourced Q&A content for the technical community. They also have a job listings board that is searchable based on you your technical expertise. If you filter for remote jobs, you will see they generally have a few hundred of those development roles (mostly on a full-time basis) at any given time.

  • Staff - Unique to job boards, staff.com is 100% free for both job seekers and employers looking to post jobs for remote work. At the time of this writing, Staff had 403 active jobs that you could filter and search by skill, part-time vs. full-time, and hourly vs. monthly payment.

  • Upwork - If you’ve heard of Elance and Odesk, they’ve both disappeared and merged to become Upwork, making it the world’s largest freelancer marketplace for remote work. Jobs listed on Upwork tend to be in the digital web development space (in particular website and graphic design and development. However, when we looked, there are also plenty of customer service, marketing, sales, data entry and writing roles available on a project basis.

  • Virtual Vocations - A job board listing over 60 career categories and hand-screened positions from administrative jobs to executive positions, Virtual Vocations charges job seekers a subscription fee for full access to their job listings and a free version for partial access. They list full-time, part-time and contract based work but all of it is remote work.

  • Werk - Werk is a new online talent exchange that pairs skilled women with flexible work opportunities with employers. They facilitate short-term projects such as maternity leave solutions, job-sharing and remote projects from employers.

  • We Work Remotely - This site offers predominantly tech and IT positions at smaller tech firms or leading start-ups. Filtered by recently, and category, job seekers can find a list of 100% remote positions. They also offer jobs in marketing and customer service.

  • Working Nomads - Offering a short but highly curated list of remote jobs, job seekers can sign up to receive regular job updates and find work in the development and design areas. Working Nomads also offers jobs in IT and customer service. Their site design is sure to inspire some wanderlust!


Even if you’re not sure if remote-working is for you, reviewing a few of these resources will give you a better idea of what’s out there (job title, salary, employers, etc). And if we’ve missed a great remote job board, please let us know and we’ll add it. Happy job-searching!

Update. The following resources for remote jobs have also come to our attention:

  • Remotely Awesome Jobs - If you're familiar with Indeed, you will understand the concept behind this aggregator of remote jobs. They currently scour 10 other sites for remote job listings, sparing some of the hunting-and-pecking on individual sites. 

  • Expat Genius - This site helps expats find locals who are willing to help them settle into their new home country, culture and environs. If you're looking to capitalize on your knowledge of, well, your home city and country, this could be a great freelance opportunity.

  • RemoteJobs - Their goal is to provide remote workers with great leads on remote jobs and connect remote-friendly employers to high-quality applicants for their roles.

  • Hubstaff - A new freelance directory that sets itself apart by being free of all fees and markups.


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