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BY Fairygodboss

Getting Paid More: What Job Skills Do You Need?

New Skills

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TAGS: Job search, Career goals, Compensation, Career change

Whether you’re actively looking for a new job, or simply interested in browsing what’s on offer, it’s important to keep your finger on the pulse of the job skills and career experiences that the job market demands. This way, no matter what job you’re doing, you can be aware of the areas where your resume or skills-set could use an extra boost. Improving your skills in these areas could be the key to a future promotion, or simply more pay in your next role.

Unsurprisingly, the areas to invest in improving your skills depend on your role and industry. Recently, Payscale released a helpful report showing the top 3 skills for approximately 17 different job types that correlate with a higher-than-average salary for those job roles.

For example, Payscale found that if you work in management, IT risk, mergers and acquisitions and SAP Business Intelligence are areas where employees seem to command a premium salary. Conversely, in the arts and media industries, Autodesk, UX and UI design were some of the most highly compensated skill sets.

If you’re just starting out in the job-market, Payscale also found that certain skills were highly valued by hiring managers, but not prevalent among recent graduates. If you’re recently out of school or planning your entry into the workforce for the first time, it might be good to keep these hard-skills in mind:

  • Writing
  • Public speaking
  • Data analysis (Excel, Tableau, Python, R, etc)
  • Industry-specific software (Salesforce, CAD, Quickbooks, etc)
  • Mathematics

Demonstrating your proficiency in these areas might give you an edge in your job search or job application process. However, you may have to think creatively about how to demonstrate these skills because many of these items will never appear on your resume (or will not mean much as a line item without further proof). For example, if you’re a strong writer, consider publishing a few posts on your personal blog, website, or on your LinkedIn page and linking to the post on your resume. That way, your writing skills will have a chance to shine.

But how do you improve your market value and skills if you’ve identified a gap or area for improvement? You can take a class or do some reading, for starters. Many employers offer online training courses for employees and there are endless online class options these days. However, time to take webinars may not be realistic, or that simply may not be your preferred style of learning.

There are also more hands-on, practical approaches to learning. You can volunteer to work on a project that might lead to more experience in area of interest, or tell your manager about your desire to acquire a specific, new skill. Showing initiative and interest in self-improvement is a sign of an engaged and valuable employee, and even if no new project or assignment is immediately available, your manager will have filed away a mental note about your initiative-taking for future opportunities.

Regardless of what you do, thinking about how to demonstrate your existing skills and acquire new, valuable ones is an important part of making sure you’re maximizing your salary and advancing your career.

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women.

Related Community Discussions

  • I am currently 36 weeks pregnant and gearing up to go on maternity leave at the end of the month. I recently came across a new job oppurnity that would be better for my family. I'm at the finishing stages of interviewing with this new company and I am worried that I will find out I got the job while on maternity leave. My question is, what happens to my maternity benefits and how do I go about leaving my current job without issue?

  • I am trying to change career paths. I was laid off in Nov. 2016. I spoke with a master resume writer yesterday who recommended an entirely new resume, LinkedIn overhaul, valuation letter and summary/biography all for close to $3000. I also received a call for an interview for a part-time job, $10/hour, no benefits. Needless to say I burst into tears by the end of the day.

    I had high hope when I obtained my law degree (especially after working full-time & attending night classes). I've tried contacting the law school and my undergrad career centers but have received only nominal assistance. They both wished me luck, gave me login's to their job portals and had nothing more to suggest.

    Someone mentioned networking & I agree that is an option but here in Michigan is comes with a fee to attend events, seminars or join associations. I understand we are all trying to make money but I graduated from law school during the recession and have 6 figures in student loans. I also am running out of unemployment.

    The master resume writer explained only 15% of people get hired from online applications. Is that true? If so then why are we even bothering with an online system at all? She suggested I find the hiring manager & connect with that person. The hiring manager is sometimes 2 people deep in the company so how do I find the person who told HR that they need a person for X job?

    I've reached out to people on LinkedIn and have not gotten much response or advice. Are there any mentors or HR people that can suggest anything that is free? My mom thinks I should go back to school but with a BA and JD that I am still paying for adding to the debt with no promises that another degree will land me a job doesn't seem wise.

    I am frustrated, disheartened and angry that the process of finding a job has become so convoluted but understand why it has. I've read so many articles on LinkedIn that they conflict with one another...you need a cover letter, no you need a pain letter, don't bother you don't need these because HR won't read it. Your resume needs skills, don't list your skills, list dates, don't list dates, take off references. Which article do I believe? Adding insult to injury the unemployment agency here requires your resume to be uploaded to the talent network. Do you know what companies contacted me expressing interest in my skill-set? Tru-Green lawn care as a fertilizer sprayer and a local manufacture as a line-worker. Is that all I am capable of and are they even reading my resume?

    If there is anyone out there who can help please respond and as 1 talk-show host says everyday at the end of her show remember to "be king to one another".

  • I am trying to change career paths. I was laid off in Nov. 2016. I spoke with a master resume writer yesterday who recommended an entirely new resume, LinkedIn overhaul, valuation letter and summary/biography all for close to $3000. I also received a call for an interview for a part-time job, $10/hour, no benefits. Needless to say I burst into tears by the end of the day.

    I had high hope when I obtained my law degree (especially after working full-time & attending night classes). I've tried contacting the law school and my undergrad career centers but have received only nominal assistance. They both wished me luck, gave me login's to their job portals and had nothing more to suggest.

    Someone mentioned networking & I agree that is an option but here in Michigan is comes with a fee to attend events, seminars or join associations. I understand we are all trying to make money but I graduated from law school during the recession and have 6 figures in student loans. I also am running out of unemployment.

    The master resume writer explained only 15% of people get hired from online applications. Is that true? If so then why are we even bothering with an online system at all? She suggested I find the hiring manager & connect with that person. The hiring manager is sometimes 2 people deep in the company so how do I find the person who told HR that they need a person for X job?

    I've reached out to people on LinkedIn and have not gotten much response or advice. Are there any mentors or HR people that can suggest anything that is free? My mom thinks I should go back to school but with a BA and JD that I am still paying for adding to the debt with no promises that another degree will land me a job doesn't seem wise.

    I am frustrated, disheartened and angry that the process of finding a job has become so convoluted but understand why it has. I've read so many articles on LinkedIn that they conflict with one another...you need a cover letter, no you need a pain letter, don't bother you don't need these because HR won't read it. Your resume needs skills, don't list your skills, list dates, don't list dates, take off references. Which article do I believe? Adding insult to injury the unemployment agency here requires your resume to be uploaded to the talent network. Do you know what companies contacted me expressing interest in my skill-set? Tru-Green lawn care as a fertilizer sprayer and a local manufacture as a line-worker. Is that all I am capable of and are they even reading my resume?

    If there is anyone out there who can help please respond and as 1 talk-show host says everyday at the end of her show remember to "be king to one another".

  • Does anyone here work for Earnst & Young? I see their communications department is hiring for multiple roles I think I'm qualified for. I'd like to learn more "inside scoop" from a current or former employee. Also looking to learn more about how this department is structured so I can figure out which of the positions I should apply for. Don't want to apply for all of them and have it look as if I'm spamming them with my resume.

  • Any advice for someone searching for work during their first trimester of pregnancy? I currently work with a temp agency for income and am applying for my next role. From what I've read on the boards, it seems that most women are firmly established at their companies but I was forced to look for a new role outside of my former company due to a health condition. They were unwilling to move me to a different role within the company. Any suggestions on how to navigate the next 4-6 months before giving birth?

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Getting Paid More: What Job Skills Do You Need?

Getting Paid More: What Job Skills Do You Need?

Whether you’re actively looking for a new job, or simply interested in browsing what’s on offer , it’s important to keep your finger ...

Whether you’re actively looking for a new job, or simply interested in browsing what’s on offer, it’s important to keep your finger on the pulse of the job skills and career experiences that the job market demands. This way, no matter what job you’re doing, you can be aware of the areas where your resume or skills-set could use an extra boost. Improving your skills in these areas could be the key to a future promotion, or simply more pay in your next role.

Unsurprisingly, the areas to invest in improving your skills depend on your role and industry. Recently, Payscale released a helpful report showing the top 3 skills for approximately 17 different job types that correlate with a higher-than-average salary for those job roles.

For example, Payscale found that if you work in management, IT risk, mergers and acquisitions and SAP Business Intelligence are areas where employees seem to command a premium salary. Conversely, in the arts and media industries, Autodesk, UX and UI design were some of the most highly compensated skill sets.

If you’re just starting out in the job-market, Payscale also found that certain skills were highly valued by hiring managers, but not prevalent among recent graduates. If you’re recently out of school or planning your entry into the workforce for the first time, it might be good to keep these hard-skills in mind:

Demonstrating your proficiency in these areas might give you an edge in your job search or job application process. However, you may have to think creatively about how to demonstrate these skills because many of these items will never appear on your resume (or will not mean much as a line item without further proof). For example, if you’re a strong writer, consider publishing a few posts on your personal blog, website, or on your LinkedIn page and linking to the post on your resume. That way, your writing skills will have a chance to shine.

But how do you improve your market value and skills if you’ve identified a gap or area for improvement? You can take a class or do some reading, for starters. Many employers offer online training courses for employees and there are endless online class options these days. However, time to take webinars may not be realistic, or that simply may not be your preferred style of learning.

There are also more hands-on, practical approaches to learning. You can volunteer to work on a project that might lead to more experience in area of interest, or tell your manager about your desire to acquire a specific, new skill. Showing initiative and interest in self-improvement is a sign of an engaged and valuable employee, and even if no new project or assignment is immediately available, your manager will have filed away a mental note about your initiative-taking for future opportunities.

Regardless of what you do, thinking about how to demonstrate your existing skills and acquire new, valuable ones is an important part of making sure you’re maximizing your salary and advancing your career.

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women.

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