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BY Fairygodboss

How to Capitalize on Your New Mom Skills When You Return to Work

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Photo credit: Pixabay

TAGS:New moms, Maternity leave, Work-life balance, Working moms

If you’re planning to return to work after taking maternity leave or even an extended absence to raise your children, you might be anxious about returning to the workforce. Becoming a mom is an all-consuming role, and it can be hard to feel like you’re as productive an employee as you used to be.  

You may be dreading your first day back at the office, but before you let your nerves get the best of you, take a moment to think about what you’ve been up to during your time at home. You probably think that taking a break from your career will hinder your success when you return to work, but instead of adopting a negative view, consider how can you can capitalize on your recent experiences. Half the battle of transitioning back into the workplace is parlaying the many skills you’ve employed as a mother.

When you do go back to work, be confident -- after all, you’re now an expert multi-tasker. You’ve mastered the art of being hyper aware of your kids’ behaviors and needs while also completing the day-to-day duties and errands that every adult struggles to manage. However routine the action – whether it’s making your morning coffee or grocery shopping – it is infinitely more complicated when young children are in the picture. So when you go back to work, juggling multiple projects or requests might not seem so daunting. And even when work pressures inevitably mount, take solace in the fact that you’re better equipped than ever to manage simultaneous assignments.

If you’ve taken a break from your job, you probably feel rusty on some of  the skills traditionally associated with the workplace. Keep in mind, though, that you’ve been honing some of these abilities -- just in a different context. You’ve probably grown accustomed to doing careful research before making choices that affect your family and home, making you especially efficient at navigating the sea of information available online. The same applies to money: the specifics may be entirely different, but the nature and responsibility of managing a budget at home can help prepare you for similar tasks at work.

You should also remember that your new communication skills are a great asset. Of course, interacting with kids and adults is not the same -- but whether you’re nurturing client relationships or supervising junior-level employees, if you’ve raised children, you know how to discipline and negotiate while still showing that you care.  

Returning to work is certainly nerve-wracking, and you’ll go through a period of adjustment that might sometimes be a bit rocky. But if you’re prepared to take advantage of the abilities and skills you developed during your time off, your transition won’t seem so intimidating.

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