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BY Fairygodboss

What Your LinkedIn Photo Says About You

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Photo credit: Creative Commons via Pixelbay

TAGS: LinkedIn, Gender equality, Women in the workplace

It never ceases to amaze us what you can find and do online. 

PhotoFeeler, for example, is a website that helps people get crowdsourced opinions about their LinkedIn profile photo helps you select an appropriate "professional" image. 

Sounds great and intriguing until you read what the founder of the site, Anne Pierce, has to say about what she's learned. In a piece titled "The Sexist Formula for Dressing Professionally That I Learned Running a Website That Crowdsources First Impressions of LinkedIn Photos" she argues that "looking professional"is a contradiction-laden assignment (e.g. "Be assertive but not too aggressive,") that doesn't register as discriminatory but is fundamentally based on unconscious gender bias.

Her conclusions are that to look professional, you should follow 3 rules:

1. Copy men. She believes that women interested in looking professional should wear a suit.

2. Be feminine, but not too feminine. In other words: a little bit of color, and certainly high heels. Not too high, though. And wear a skirt suit rather than a pantsuit. 

3. Do not be too sexually appealing. Make sure your outfit is not too baggy -- but avoid anything too form fitting or revealing.

It's a bit unclear to us just how much of your clothing, shoes and makeup can really come across in a LinkedIn photo. After all, aren't most of them headshots? Thank goodness for that.

 

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women.
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What Your LinkedIn Photo Says About You

What Your LinkedIn Photo Says About You

It never ceases to amaze us what you can find and do online.  PhotoFeeler , for example, is a website that helps people get crowdsourced opinio...

It never ceases to amaze us what you can find and do online. 

PhotoFeeler, for example, is a website that helps people get crowdsourced opinions about their LinkedIn profile photo helps you select an appropriate "professional" image. 

Sounds great and intriguing until you read what the founder of the site, Anne Pierce, has to say about what she's learned. In a piece titled "The Sexist Formula for Dressing Professionally That I Learned Running a Website That Crowdsources First Impressions of LinkedIn Photos" she argues that "looking professional"is a contradiction-laden assignment (e.g. "Be assertive but not too aggressive,") that doesn't register as discriminatory but is fundamentally based on unconscious gender bias.

Her conclusions are that to look professional, you should follow 3 rules:

1. Copy men. She believes that women interested in looking professional should wear a suit.

2. Be feminine, but not too feminine. In other words: a little bit of color, and certainly high heels. Not too high, though. And wear a skirt suit rather than a pantsuit. 

3. Do not be too sexually appealing. Make sure your outfit is not too baggy -- but avoid anything too form fitting or revealing.

It's a bit unclear to us just how much of your clothing, shoes and makeup can really come across in a LinkedIn photo. After all, aren't most of them headshots? Thank goodness for that.

 

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women.
Join us by reviewing your employer!
 

 

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