Work From Home Companies: 13 Sites to Find Remote Jobs

Photo Credit: AdobeStock/ Flamingo Images

By Jane Scudder

READ MORE: Job search, Working remotely, Fairygodboss Inc., Flexibility, FlexJobs, PowerToFly, The Muse, Upwork, We Work Remotely, Idealist, Virtual Vocations, AngelList

With increased connectivity in today's wired world, many workers have the desire to work remotely. Working from home all or most days every week can have a lot of benefits and help workers maintain a reasonable work-life balance. But how do the people with these roles actually find them? Do they have unicorn super powers?

Nope, they just remain focused on their priorities, leverage their networks, and know where to look. While the first two are fairly self-explanatory, the last point may require a little guidance.

So how, exactly, do can job seekers find work from home companies and start enjoying the benefits of remote careers?

Here are 13 of the best websites to get you started:

1. Power to Fly

This site is focused on empowering professionals and hiring companies to demand greater inclusion and gender diversity at work. Why are they great for helping job seekers discover remote work opportunities? To start, they provide a search filter to find remote job openings. More importantly, flexibility is a part of their DNA, and they are pushing organizations to include it in their business models. One of their key ideas is the concept that employees—who will nearly all become caregivers at some point in their lives—should be valued based on their contribution and impact, not the amount of time they spend glued to their desk every week. Remote tasks empower this notion.

2. The Mom Project

The Mom Project is a digital marketplace that identifies businesses and career opportunities for talented, professional women. They staff project-based, permanent, and what they call “Maternityship” career placements. It's a great resource for both working parents and the businesses that hire them.

3. Werk

Werk connects users with tasks and roles that come with prenegotiated flexibility. If you’ve ever thought, “I do much better work knowing that I can drop my children off at school and make it to their sports games without questions...It’d be great if I could physically start my day at 10:00 in the office, then leave at 6:00, or sometimes leave at 3:00, knowing that I spend about 5 hours every Sunday catching up anyway…” then Werk might just be your answer. They have a fundamental belief that flexibility—or lack thereof—is a key reason women are held back and/or stagnated professionally and data to back this up. They "werk" to provide solutions to combat this by making flexibility part of all job listings posted on their site. They have specific descriptions of types of flexible work options and solutions, including remote and part-time, as well as their TimeShift™ and DeskPlus™ offerings.

And since seasoned remote employees know that it takes a talented leader and team to manage a remote group, Werk has recently rolled out a flexibility certification—FlexCert™—to organizations to enable managers to better support and lead flexible teams.

4. Career Contessa

Founded by a former recruiter at Hulu, Contessa’s list of opportunities and options might be smaller than other sites but that’s because it’s highly curated. It also has search engine filters that allow you to find only remote roles, and you can sign up for a weekly newsletter that sends these opportunities right to you.

5. The Muse

The Muse is a job search staple and has insight on job listings, techniques for creating winning applications, and more. They post hundreds of job openings regularly and have a search engine filter that allows you to search specifically for remote roles. You can learn about more about organizations by reading bios of people who work there.

6. Fairygodboss

Oh hi! Of course you already know about Fairygodboss; you're reading this article! But did you know that Fairygodboss empowers working women to share data, insights, and perspectives on companies and opportunities, including which companies tend to be open to hiring remote workers? In the reviews and comment boards, you can sleuth around and learn if any companies might talk a big remote work game but lag in actually standing by these policies.

7. We Work Remotely

Ever feel like job boards are 90 percent filled positions, particularly those coveted remote ones? We Work Remotely includes fresh job postings on a regular basis. It’s a simple, no-frills job board that you should be checking regularly if flexibility is your goal.

8. Remote.co

As the name implies, this site is dedicated to remote work. It offers commentary on the value of remote work, supports businesses that already embrace this work style or who might be considering the shift, and has endless resources for candidates. They have great diversity in postings from virtual assistance to general counsel.

9. Virtual Vocations

This site does the job search heavy lifting for you. They search over 10,000 company careers pages and job boards daily so you don't have to. They boast over 500 jobs posted daily, over 15,000 remote jobs, and a database of over 10,000 companies who offer flexible work.

They also offer e-courses and downloadable resources to help manage and maximize telework arrangements, so once you become a remote worker (or if you already are one) you can brush up on ways to operate efficiently and effectively from home.

10. Idealist

Looking for remote work in a non-profit business? Look no further. Idealist.org pulls non-profit organizations and social impact opportunities from across the country. While this site is not 100 percent remote, they have a remote filter that has quite a few full-time, volunteer, and event-based opportunities at non-profit organizations.

11. AngelList

If you’re interested in working for a startup and not using AngelList, that needs to change now. Startups and any small businesses are hard work, so this will not yield a remote role in which you can spend the majority of your day vacuuming as opposed to sitting in meetings, but, then again, what great, well-paid role would allow that?

AngelList boasts over 75,000 startup jobs that include details like money (both salary figures and equity) info upfront, over 5,000 of these being remote work or remote work-friendly. It also offers insight to investment opportunities. While not all roles are flexible, it’s a must-use resource for startups and small businesses that allows you to see opportunities, and requirements upfront.

12. FlexJobs

If flexibility is your number one goal, it might be worthwhile to get a paid subscription to this remote work staple. If you’re not keen on spending your money to pay a subscription fee, simply search for free on their site, and then open a new browser tab and look up the roles on a company’s site (but keep in mind others might be doing the same!).

FlexJobs also posts an annual ranking of companies with remote jobs. Here’s their 2018 ranking: Top 100 Companies with Remote Jobs.

13. Upwork

Upwork is essentially a freelancing marketplace, but that can be a great option if flexibility and work-life balance are your priorities. It can become a strong lead source for independent contractors and experienced professionals who post their bios and expertise. Depending on your specific situation, it can be a great way to keep working and find something that pays while making a transition—like if you’re moving across the country for your partner’s job and want to maintain work continuity agnostic of a location. Perhaps once you’re settled into your new home you can leverage this experience to help score a new, full-time gig, or maybe you love the remote work life so much you'll continue doing it even after a transition.


As the modern workplace changes, companies are becoming more aware that they must support the flexible needs and wants of top talent. So whether you’ve been working remotely for years and are looking for a new role or have been dreaming about working in slippers for years, check out these resources for insight, advice and of course, job postings!

 

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Jane Scudder is a leadership and personal development coach; she helps individuals and groups get unstuck. She builds and leads original workshops and training programs, consults with organizations of various sizes, and is Adjunct Faculty at Loyola University Chicago. Find out more at janescudder.com.

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