30 Famous Slogans in Advertising History & How To Create Your Own

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By Kristina Udice

READ MORE: Apple, The Walt Disney Company, General Electric, Nike, Inc., Quotes, Money, Adidas, Capital One Financial Corporation, Verizon Communications, Walmart, KFC, McDonald's Corporation, Wendy's, FedEx Corporation, Kellogg Company, Motorola Solutions, Inc., State Farm, Subway, Visa Inc., Maybelline, Burger King, Red Bull, Maxwell House, Gillette

When you think of a fun and catchy slogan, what phrases come to mind? Are they short and punchy? Are they deeply emotional? Do they come with a tune that gets stuck in your head?

Slogans and their accompanying campaigns are some of the best tools advertisers have to connect with their audiences. They give integrity to a brand or product. They are a quick and efficient way to grab attention and build awareness around a given product or brand. But even though these short phrases look like they’re easy to create, a lot of time and effort has to go into to crafting a perfect slogan, especially if you want it to stick in people’s minds and persuade them to act. So what goes into crafting a famous slogan?

What is a slogan?

First and foremost, we need to understand what exactly a slogan is. Of course, you’ve seen and heard slogans that stick with you, but you can’t just slap on a catchy jingle or throw a sentence under a company logo and expect to see it succeed.

A slogan is a phrase, usually only a few words in length, that is highly memorable. Good slogans are punchy, effective, and powerful snippets that advertisers use to promote a product, brand, company, or certain aspect of a given product.

Slogans often appear with the logo of a brand, and usually their goal is to emulate the mission statement of an organization or the intention behind a product. Slogans can be highly effective for advertisers; if they can create one that sticks, they can craft a lasting image of the organization that will exist maybe even years after a product has left shelves.

Slogans are sometimes also known as catch lines or taglines.

What makes up a good slogan?

What are some components of a particularly effective slogan? How does a slogan go from average and forgettable to famous and lasting?

For a marketer or advertising agency, it’s important that your team has come to a collective understanding about what your message needs to be. You can’t be confused about your mission; otherwise, you’ll create a slogan that lacks power and purpose. Consumers aren’t stupid, and they’ll see right through a dull, vague slogan.

1. Keep it short and sweet.

For a slogan to make a statement, it needs to be short. You’re not describing the entire product or organization here; you’re just giving people a taste of what it’s all about. Generally, keeping a slogan under eight words will ensure you’re using all 8 words as effectively as possible.

2. Don’t give it an expiration date.

When it comes to crafting a catchy brand slogan or ad slogan, you want it to transcend time. Don’t include references to current events or social/political climates. The world is always changing, evolving, and growing. If your slogan is to current, it won’t be relateable into the future and people will forget about it.

3. Make sure its powerful without any added effects.

Slogans run alongside logos, but make sure they don't need any context or boost from other images and phrases. In other words, the most successful famous advertising slogans can stand alone. Your product or brand will be known for these words, so make them count.

4. Don’t get too fancy with your word choice.

When it comes to word choice, keep it simple. You don't need to assume that consumers are not intelligent, but trying to throw in big, fancy words to make your brand or product seem super smart and sophisticated can turn away a whole audience or come off as pretentious. In addition, big words are sometimes not as catchy; when every word you’re using has 3 syllables or more, the slogan can become to longwinded and clunky.

5. Be honest.

While marketers and advertisers want to puff up their products, they shouldn't lie. A slogan shouldn’t dishonestly portray a product or brand. If your slogan says your product does something that it doesn’t, your audience will find out and you will lose all credibility.

What are some examples of famous slogans?

Even with all these tips and insights, it might seem like a difficult task to jump into the creative process of coming up with an advertising slogan that will succeed. To help kickstart the brainstorming, here are 40 famous slogans that have successfully stuck with brands and products for years.

1. Skittles — “Taste the Rainbow”

2. Red Bull — “Red Bull Gives You Wings”

3. Maybelline – “Maybe She’s Born With It, Maybe It’s Maybelline”

4. Nike – “Just Do It”

5. Walmart – “Save Money. Live Better.”

6. EA – “Challenge Everything”

7. Disney – “The happiest place on earth”

8. McDonalds – “I’m lovin’ it”

9. Apple – “Think different”

10. Kentucky Fried Chicken — “Finger Lickin’ Good”

11. Kellogg’s Rice Krispies — “Snap! Crackle! Pop!”

12. Maxwell House — “Good To The Last Drop”

13. Burger King — “Have It Your Way”

14. FedEx — “When There Is No Tomorrow”

15. Nikon — “At The Heart Of The Image”

16. Adidas — “Impossible Is Nothing”

17. De Beers — “A Diamond Is Forever”

18. Subway — “Eat Fresh”

19. M&M — “Melts In Your Mouth, Not In Your Hands”

20. L’Oreal — “Because You’re Worth It”

21. General Electric — “Imagination At Work”

22. Energizer — “It Keeps Going and Going and Going

23. Capital One — “What’s In Your Wallet?”

24. Gillette — “The Best A Man Can Get”

25. State Farm — “Like A Good Neighbor, State Farm Is There”

26. Verizon — “Can You Hear Me Now?”

27. Wendy’s — “Where’s The Beef?”

28. Visa — “It’s Everywhere You Want To Be”

29. Motorola — “Hello Moto”

30. Kodak — “Share Moments. Share Life.”

Creating famous advertising slogans and taglines is a difficult business, but one that can do your brand or company many favors for years to come. A catchy slogan doesn’t go away, which is exactly what you want for brand awareness and sales from a marketing campaign. So keep these tips in mind when you get ready to launch your next big venture!

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