AnnaMarie Houlis
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Journalist & travel blogger

Congratulations on your job interview — you've gone into the office, had your interview and nailed it. You've already even sent your first follow-up thank-you email letting your interview know how much you appreciated their time and how excited you were to talk about the next steps.

But they never responded to your first follow-up email, and now it's been a few weeks since you've had the interview. You're probably wondering if they've forgotten all about you, or if you've been passed up for the job. Maybe another candidate really did get the job over you, or maybe the company is still busy doing interviews. Whatever the case, you have two options: wait patiently or send another follow-up email.

When You Should (and Shouldn't) You Send Another Follow-up Email

There are times when you certainly should and shouldn't send a second follow-up email.

When You Should Send Another Follow-Up

  • When you really want the job, but it's been a few weeks since you've gotten any word.
  • When you were told to expect to hear back by a certain date, and that date has passed.
  • When you were promised a follow-up interview or call, but you don't know the details to it.

When You Shouldn't Send Another Follow-Up

  • When you think you'll probably reject the offer if you do indeed get it.
  • When it's only been a few days, let alone hours.
  • When the interviewer mentioned that it'd be a few weeks before you hear back, but to be patient.

Tips for Sending a Follow-up Email

If you decide to go ahead with sending a follow-up email, there are some tips you should certainly keep in mind.

  • Always personally address the interview or person to whom you're contacting.
  • Always thank the interviewer for their time.
  • Always express your enthusiasm for the job.
  • Be sure to include any details, materials, experiences or other valuable pieces of information that you forgot to share or mention.
  • Always close your follow-up email with a call to action or the assumption (as opposed to the hope) that you're going to speak soon.
  • Proofread and edit your email before sending it.

What Are Some Examples of Follow-up Emails to Send?

Here are five examples of second follow-up email templates you can steal for yourself.

1. The "Nice to Meet You, Let's Do It Again Sometime" Follow-up Email

Hi [First name],

I hope this email finds you well! I just wanted to touch base once more, as it was so nice to meet you at your office [date of interview]. Thanks again for your time. I really enjoyed learning more about the position and [something you discussed].

As I mentioned in my last email, I’m really interested to hear more about your [company], as [reason why you’re interested]. If you have time in the coming weeks, let’s [follow-up action]. I’m free on [dates], if any of those dates and times work for you.

I'm looking forward to keeping in touch.

Best,

[Your name]

2. The "I Figured I'd Give You Another Try Here" Follow-up Email

Hey [First name],

I just sent you an email last week, but I figured I'd drop you another quick line in case you missed it. I know it's been a crazy week with [reason why the week may have been crazy, such as the holidays].

I just wanted to thank you again for taking the time to meet with me to discuss the position in more detail. I really enjoyed learning more about your company, and I look forward to talking more about the next steps. Please let me know if there's anything else you need from me in the meantime.

Thanks!

[Your name]

3. The "Thanks Again" Follow-up Email

Dear [First name]

I just wanted to say thank you again for taking the time out of your busy schedule to talk to me about [the position] with [company name]. I appreciate your time and consideration.

After meeting with you and your colleagues, [names of colleagues], I believe that my experience posits me as the perfect candidate for this position. In addition to my enthusiasm for [the field], I would bring the [XYZ skills] necessary to get the job done.

I am reaching out once more to express that I am very interested in working for you and sincerely look forward to hearing from you soon. Please feel free to contact me at any time if you need any more information.

Thank you again,

[Your name]

4. The "I Have Another Question" Follow-up Email

Dear [First name]

It was a pleasure meeting you a few weeks ago and discussing the [position] at [company]. I really appreciate the time you took to interview me for the role.

I enjoyed meeting everyone on the team and appreciate their honest answers to my questions about the role and company. The more I spoke with you and your team, the more I was convinced that my experience and my passion for [industry] make me a strong candidate for this position. I've been thinking a lot about the job since talking with you, and I wanted to reach out with just one more question since our last discussion.

[Question about the position.]

Thank you again for your time and consideration.

Best,

[Your name]

5. The "I Have More Materials for You" Follow-up Email

Dear [First name],

It was a pleasure to finally meet you after our many emails and phone conversations regarding the [position]. I truly enjoyed learning more about the [role] and [department] at [company]. And I appreciated you answering all of my questions.

I know we'd discussed my resume and how I feel that my previous experiences position me as the perfect candidate for this position. I've gone ahead and reached out to former employers who can vouch for my skills so you're not only hearing it from me. I'm attaching three reference letters that I'd like to share with you — I hope you find these helpful in making your final decision.

Best regards,

[Your name]

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About the Career Expert:

AnnaMarie Houlis is a multimedia journalist for a gamut of both online and print publications, as well as an adventure aficionado and travel blogger at HerReport.org. She covers all things women's empowerment — from navigating the workplace to navigating the world. She writes about everything from gender issues in the workforce to gender issues all across the globe.

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