8 Tried-And-True Ways to Get Rich (And Stay That Way)

Photo Credit: AdobeStock/Drobot Dean

By Kristina Udice

READ MORE: Networking, Conferences, Finance, Linkedin, Money, 401k

Have you ever wondered how rich people do it? 'How did they get there, what did they do, and what can I do to be like them?'

Most of us want to know how to get rich quick. Are there secrets? Is there a super secret, invite-only organization that makes people self-made millionaires? What are the habits of successful people and how do I adopt those same habits? How did they grow such a successful personal brand?

We’re constantly looking for short-cuts and “get rich quick” schemes, looking back on our own lives and self-reflecting. Believe me, I’ve been there. But the truth of the matter is that wealth and millionaire status is not easy to obtain. There is no trick to see the dollars stack up and the cash flow skyrocket. It’s actually a lot of work. But that doesn’t mean it’s impossible. If you’re dedicated, ambitious, and disciplined, you have what it takes to get rich.

Are you enterprising? Motivated? Strict with your personal finances and your savings account? Do you know how the stock market works? Do you know how to keep track of your dollars? Do you pay off your credit card every month? Then you’re well on your way to wealth and a successful life as a self-made millionaire (probably).

If you want to know how to get rich — and stay rich — follow these eight steps.

1. Invest in yourself.

You’re going to have to put money into yourself if you want to succeed. This means putting money towards courses, seminars, and classes that will can train you to be the best at what you do. It also means investing in the industry you’re entering. If you’re an entrepreneur you’re going to have to invest in your product, if you’re a small business owner you’re going to have to invest in your business. Investing in yourself will give you the boost you need to succeed because you’ll be providing yourself with the essential skills required to see profits. It’s also the most profitable way to see a return on investment. It’s not only good because it will help you unlock creativity, learn new skills, and develop a new mindset, but it also tells the outside world that you’re worth investing in, too. You took the risk and they should do the same.

2. Always be networking.

In order to succeed, you need people to know about you and your business. They need to see the hard work and understand your mission statement. And the best way to get the word out (for cheap) is to already have a laundry list of contacts up your sleeve before hand. This means that you need to constantly be on the lookout for contacts and connections that could help you in the long run. Attend networking events and conferences where you can meet up with like-minded people, share goals and ambitions, and connect for the future.

LinkedIn has become an invaluable tool and getting connected at the very least on the social platform can do wonders for you down the road. Because you never know what connections these people have. If you’re trying to get a project funded or trying to get an idea off the round and you need outside support, having these connections could put you at the front of the line.

3. Have multiple sources of income.

When it comes to getting rich quick, it’s all about the side hustle. Of course, you need to invest in your primary source of income and ambition, but having multiple streams of income means, of course, more money down the line. And we are trying to get rich, right? A way to do this is by investing in retirement and many people already do this with 401ks. Another way to do this is to invest in real estate which you can then rent out.

You could also open an online business or try turning your hobby into a business on the side for a little extra cash, or sell your time as a consultant. Buying and selling assets is a great way to make capital gains income as well. Just try to stay away from playing the stock market because there is no guarantee for success, and you might end up losing it all in the process. Having multiple cash flows will help build your income and net worth down the line.

4. Set realistic goals.

First and foremost, you have to set realistic goals. You have to constantly track and check in with your finances. Otherwise, how will you know when you’ve finally made it rich? Give yourself quarterly figures to hit. Keep track of all streams of income and make sure you know where all of this money is going. But don’t track it by month — things fluctuate too much and month to month figures don’t matter as much as year-to-year figures. This will give you a better idea of where you’ll be in the long run. You’re in it for the long haul, remember?

5. Budget. Budget. Budget.

Budgeting is key when trying to get rich. It might be tempting once you see the money start rolling in to just start spending it, but that would defeat the purpose. It’s also more likely that as you begin your endeavor towards getting rich, that you won’t have a lot of money to be playing around with. Therefore, you have to give yourself a weekly budget to follow in order to stay on track. You can make changes to it as your income rises, but to start especially, it’s important not to get carried away.

The 50-30-20 rule is a great one to follow when it comes to budgeting. It’s broken down like this — 50% of your income should go towards living expenses (rent, utilities, transportation, and household necessities), 20% should go towards investments and financial goals (401k, other investments, and debts) and the last 30% is flexible spending money. Following this rule will ensure you’re not overspending or putting money somewhere it shouldn’t be.

6. Surround yourself with financially responsible people.

In order to keep yourself accountable and motivated to save money and see your finances grow, it’s helpful to be surrounded by people who do the same and understand its importance. Of course, there will be times when you have a crazier-than-expected night spending money with friends but this shouldn’t be the norm. The people you surround yourself with are an extension of who you are so it’s important that they help keep you grounded and on budget. Surround yourself with successful people. Otherwise what’s the point?

7. Sacrifice it all.

Obviously, getting rich isn’t the quickest process, but it’s worth it in the end. You will have to do a lot of sacrificing though. You’ll have to cut back on spending. You’ll have to spend time, money, and energy on yourself and your ambitious business goals. You’ll have to work hard and hold yourself accountable which is something you might not have been doing so strictly before. But in order to make it big, you’ve got to risk it big. This means that in the beginning stages you’ll probably be pretty tight on money, you won’t be going out as much, and you’ll be committed to yourself. But in the end, it’ll all be worth it.

8. Prepare for failure.

Of course these steps are pushing you towards a rich and successful future, but that doesn’t mean you won’t fail once or twice. You might put your money in an investment and it flops. You might put time towards building your personal brand to have it struggle to get off the ground. But that doesn’t mean you should throw in the towel and give up. These are just small obstacles that you will have to overcome before it gets easier and begins coming more naturally. That being said, prepare to fail. It’s the only way to know what you’re doing right and what you’re doing wrong so you don’t have to make the same mistakes again.

These steps seem simple enough on their own, but when you put the entire plan into place, amazing things can happen. No more living paycheck to paycheck. No more eating plain noodles for dinner (unless you’re into that sort of thing). No more maxing out credit cards every month to pay for crazy night out or fancy subscription boxes.

This isn’t a foolproof plan, of course. And there are other things you can do in addition to these 8 things to guarantee success. But if you follow these rules, you’ll be on your way to financial success and prosperity. It isn’t a quick fix or a short cut, but it’s a change in mindset and attitude. That’s what’s most important — changing the way you think about money. Because in order to get rich, you have to want it and you have to work for it. It’s a day-to-day process that won’t happen overnight, or even in a few months. But once you get there, it’ll be so worth it.

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