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#Awareness
3 Reasons for Recognizing National Domestic Violence Awareness Month
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The statistics are sobering: 10 million people suffer from physical abuse by a partner per year in the U.S., according to the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence (NCADV). That equates to nearly 20 people per minute. 

For women, the figures are even worse. One in three have experienced some form of physical violence by an intimate partner, and one in 10 women have been raped by an intimate partner. The issue hits young women the hardest, with females between the ages of 18 and 24 as the most abused demographic. And this isn't a new problem; domestic abuse has plagued the U.S. for years. It's only in recent years that government and private agencies have put effort into bringing the problem into the open.

That's why, in 1987,  the NCADV initiated an awareness campaign — National Domestic Violence Awareness Month — to bring light to the devastating issue, and to hopefully move solutions forward. Unfortunately, the need still persists today for this campaign. 

When is National Domestic Violence Awareness Month?

October is designated National Domestic Violence Awareness Month by the Office on Violence Against Women (OVW) within the U.S. Department of Justice.

Background and history.

Domestic Violence Awareness Month was first held in 1987, the same year as the debut of the first national domestic violence toll-free hotline. Two years later, Congress passed Public Law 101-112, officially designating October as National Domestic Violence Awareness Month. 

The idea evolved from October 1981's "Day of Unity," an event for connecting those who work to end domestic abuse, by the NCADV.  The day evolved into a week of activities and awareness campaigns held at the local, state and national levels. 

Three key themes were present in these weeks, according to the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence:

  • Mourning those who have died because of domestic violence
  • Celebrating those who have survived
  • Connecting those who work to end violence

Now, the first Monday of October is recognized as the Day of Unity. 

What is the definition of domestic violence?

According to the U.S. Department of Justice, domestic violence:

includes felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction receiving grant monies, or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction.

3 Reasons to support National Domestic Violence Awareness Month

1. The problem is far from being solved.

As the numbers show, we have a long way to go to end domestic abuse. Awareness drives action, and a monthlong recognition of the issue at hand helps spur change. 

2. You can help. 

Awareness and support are two ways everyone can get involved with an issue that affects so many people across the U.S. Whether your organization takes part in a larger call to action, or if you decide to take action at an individual level, whether through donations of time or money or something else, it's essential to consider what you can do to help the cause.

3. It's personal.

With one in three women and one in four men suffering severe abuse from a partner, it's highly likely that someone in your life has suffered. Educate yourself and others on what resources are in your area, and what the signs of abuse look like and how you can help. 

Resources for National Domestic Violence Awareness Month

The Domestic Violence Awareness Project offers:

Find the laws and regulations concerning violence against women on the U.S. Department of Justice site.

Break the Cycle offers support and training for young people, ages 12-24.

Resources for victims and survivors of domestic violence

The following list was compiled by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence.

The National Domestic Violence Hotline 
1-800-799-7233 (SAFE)
www.ndvh.org

National Dating Abuse Helpline 
1-866-331-9474
www.loveisrespect.org

National Child Abuse Hotline/Childhelp 
1-800-4-A-CHILD (1-800-422-4453)
www.childhelp.org

National Sexual Assault Hotline 
1-800-656-4673 (HOPE)
www.rainn.org

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline 
1-800-273-8255 (TALK)
www.suicidepreventionlifeline.org

National Center for Victims of Crime 
1-202-467-8700
www.victimsofcrime.org

National Human Trafficking Resource Center/Polaris Project 
Call: 1-888-373-7888 | Text: HELP to BeFree (233733)
www.polarisproject.org

National Network for Immigrant and Refugee Rights 
1-510-465-1984
www.nnirr.org

National Coalition for the Homeless 
1-202-737-6444
www.nationalhomeless.org

National Resource Center on Domestic Violence 
1-800-537-2238
www.nrcdv.org and www.vawnet.org

Futures Without Violence: The National Health Resource Center on Domestic Violence 
1-888-792-2873
www.futureswithoutviolence.org

National Center on Domestic Violence, Trauma & Mental Health
1-312-726-7020 ext. 2011
www.nationalcenterdvtraumamh.org

Phone Apps

For Children

Childhelp USA/National Child Abuse Hotline 
1-800-422-4453
www.childhelpusa.org

Children’s Defense Fund 
202-628-8787
www.childrensdefense.org

Child Welfare League of America 
202-638-2952
www.cwla.org

National Council on Juvenile and Family Court Judges 
Child Protection and Custody/Resource Center on Domestic Violence
1-800-527-3233
www.ncjfcj.org

Center for Judicial Excellence 
info@centerforjudicialexcellence.org 
www.centerforjudicialexcellence.org

For Teens

Love is respect 
Hotline: 1-866-331-9474
www.loveisrespect.org

Break the Cycle 
202-824-0707
www.breakthecycle.org

College Campus Safety Guide

For Differently-Abled

Domestic Violence Initiative 
(303) 839-5510/ (877) 839-5510
www.dviforwomen.org

Deaf Abused Women’s Network (DAWN) 
Email: Hotline@deafdawn.org 
VP: 202-559-5366
www.deafdawn.org

For Women of Color

Women of Color Network 
1-800-537-2238
www.wocninc.org

INCITE! Women of Color Against Violence 
incite.natl@gmail.com 
www.incite-national.org

For Latinx

Casa de Esperanza 
Linea de crisis 24-horas/24-hour crisis line
1-651-772-1611
www.casadeesperanza.org

National Latin@ Network for Healthy Families and Communities
1-651-646-5553
www.nationallatinonetwork.org

For Immigrants

The National Immigrant Women's Advocacy Project
(202) 274-4457
http://www.niwap.org/

For Indigenous Women

National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center 
855-649-7299
www.niwrc.org

Indigenous Women’s Network 
1-512-258-3880
www.indigenouswomen.org

For Asian/Pacific Islanders

Asian and Pacific Islander Institute on Domestic Violence 
1-415-954-9988
www.apiidv.org

Committee Against Anti-Asian Violence (CAAAV) 
1-212- 473-6485
www.caaav.org

Manavi 
1-732-435-1414
www.manavi.org

For African-Americans

Institute on Domestic Violence in the African American Community 
1-877-643-8222
www.dvinstitute.org

The Black Church and Domestic Violence Institute 
1-770-909-0715
www.bcdvi.org

For LBGTQ

The Audre Lorde Project 
1-178-596-0342
www.alp.org

LAMBDA GLBT Community Services 
1-206-350-4283
http://www.qrd.org/qrd/www/orgs/avproject/main.htm

National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs 
1-212-714-1184
www.ncavp.org

National Gay and Lesbian Task Force 
1-202-393-5177
www.ngltf.org

Northwest Network of Bisexual, Trans, Lesbian & Gay Survivors of Abuse 
1-206-568-7777
www.nwnetwork.org

Trans Lifeline
877-565-8860
www.translifeline.org

For Elderly

National Clearinghouse on Abuse in Later Life 
1-608-255-0539
www.ncall.us

National Center for Elder Abuse 
1-855-500-3537
www.aginginplace.org

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