Women's Ratings
3.9
3.9
68%say women are treated fairly and equally to men
81%would recommend to other women
77%believe their CEO supports gender diversity
Highlighted Reviews

Engineering Manager

Engineering

The company offers a very broad range of career opportunities with its diverse portfolio. There are women at the officer and board levels. We understand that our biggest issue with increasing women in leadership positions is the mid-career opt-out, and we're actively working to fix that. I love that GE gives me the opportunity to take on leadership positions outside my regular job such as within the Women's Network and other affinity groups so I can grow my skills. It also allows me to volunteer to serve on the board at my university alma mater as well as recruit there and at other universities. Flexible work arrangments are available, and it's up to me to work out with my manager what makes sense for my role and my personal goals. I feel fulfilled at GE, and I hope to continue on this path for a long time.

Lead Engineer/ Lead Technologist

Engineering

I haven't taken maternity leave, but I have taken sick leave, for a couple surgeries. Of the leaves, only one was disastrous, and caused me to lose a promotion, but I had to understand that the company needed someone in the position and I wasn't ready to return to work. Otherwise, the stress I chose to take on, seemed to be unnecessary. I realize after all these years, to never burn bridges, always try to network, and keep your eyes open to opportunities in new and emerging fields.

Marketing Intelligence

Marketing

I could not recommend the company more highly for women. Obviously GE is huge and everyone's experiences aren't the same, but my leadership is incredibly supportive, actively promotes me and gives me opportunities to shine, and is flexible and understanding about my personal life (I'm a military spouse). I feel incredibly lucky that I found a job that I'm excited about and engaged in, that allows me to continue my career no matter where we get stationed.
Have Things Gotten Better, Worse, or Stayed The Same For Women at General Electric in The Past Year?
19%
Say Gotten Better
There is a new initiative focused on encouraging more women to take and maintain roles in technology- essentially acknowledging that this has been an issue in our field and committing to do something about it. Leaders are engaged and processing are beginning to change.
24%
Say Gotten Worse
As a woman of color, GE Digital is the hardest environment I've ever worked in. The culture is one where men get away with treating women disrespectfully. Many women at all levels have recently left the company. There is alot of stress and layoffs occurring at work right now so women are feeling like the work-life balance is unbalanced and they need to be at work all the time proving their worth.It's not necessarily about things worse for women specifically, but for all of the employees. Benefits have severely declined, no pay raises for years, and less opportunities to grow career. Their location strategy which is another way of reducing head count has made it difficult for women to keep their jobs. The options are travel and stay away from your family to keep your job or quit.With the financial struggles GE is having, benefits and career development opportunities are being slashed. As the pool of resources shrinks, it is concentrated on the talent being groomed for leadership roles, which is still mostly middle-aged white men. When the tide was rising, all benefited, but as the ocean dries, it is obvious who is still preferred.I came back from maternity leave and was treated terribly. I was asked to work from an office across town with double the commute. I was told 1 month back that I wasn’t engaged. I was called names by an officer of the company. I was subjected to performance reviews with the VP of HR that no one else was subject to. I was forced out of the company after reporting inappropriate behavior and having it investigated internally.With 12000 job losses across GE Power in Europe, it feels less supportive all round.
57%
Say Stayed The Same
There's a lot of talk and no action..I think that things are exactly the same. When GE Corporate released it's Balance the Equation "Millie" video, many of the employees were very negative. They see it as a quota and that doing this means we will not hire the best people. In addition, two women in my group returned from maternity leave to find that they had changed the nursing room in our building into an office. They were put in an office with glass frosted windows instead. How's that for privacy? Ridiculous.There aren't many women where I work. I do not think that anything is different from 12 months ago.The policies were good prior to this year so no change there. There has not been a visible increase in hiring of women to higher level positions. This is the most disappointing thing - there doesn't seem to be a process to increase the number of women at high level positions compared to the men being moved or hired into those positions. There is only some official movement in the hiring of entry level employees being balanced between men and women.GE made a big splash for the “balance the equation” campaign but didn’t do anything to retain the women they already have. They cut funding and program management for the 20 yr old women’s network. Sexual harassment terminations happen, but then training and messaging from executive leadership is not swift and tries to make the mostly male population feel safe rather than the women. So, maybe it’s actually gotten worse for women, how do I change my answer...?Men who are the same level are still paid more. We made a commitment that 20% of our employees would be women by 2020 and then were told it was an aspiration, not a commitment. I've not noticed any changes to practice, culture or policy impacting women. Generally speaking it's already pretty good. Exempt employees receive "unlimited" time off for vacation, personal illness and personal business with manager agreement. We also receive full pay when on FMLA leave and can take up to 10 weeks off for parental leave (i.e. bonding with a newborn). This is in addition to 6 to 8 weeks of disability leave. Younger woman fair better in terms of job advancement over older woman.
Official Employer Information

Headquarters Location

Boston MA, USA

Number of Employees

10,000+

GE (NYSE: GE) is the world's Digital Industrial Company, transforming industry with software-defined machines and solutions that are connected, responsive and predictive.

GE is organized around a global exchange of knowledge, the "GE Store," through which each business shares and accesses the same technology, markets, structure and intellect. Each invention further fuels innovation and application across our industrial sectors. With people, services, technology and scale, GE delivers better outcomes for customers by speaking the language of industry.

It is not about your career; it is not about your job title; it is about who you are. It is about the impact you are going to make on the world. You want to go into uncharted waters; do things that haven't been done to make yours and someone else's life better. GE has been and is doing that and will continue to do that! We are the world's digital industrial company.

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Crowdsourced Employer Benefits
Median/Consensus
Vacation Allowance(Weeks)
3
Paid Maternity Leave (weeks)
11
Unpaid Maternity Leave (weeks)
4
Paid Paternity Leave (weeks)
6
Unpaid Paternity Leave (weeks)
4
Flextime, Healthcare, On-Site Childcare, 401k and more...
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