discussion boards

  • I think I'm being mommy-tracked at work and it's incredibly frustrating. I'm two months back from maternity leave and putting in the same hours as I used to but I'm getting these subtle signs that I'm not taken as seriously -- ranging from not being asked about wanting to spearhead things to the stink eye when I walk out the door (at the same time I roughly used to leave the office). What should I do?

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    Tags: Career advice, Discrimination, Working moms
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    Communicate more! Maybe people are not sure what you are interested in doing now. Try putting yourself forward in projects.

  • I am about to go out on Maternity Leave and my boss got a maternity leave cover for me. I know I'm on track to get promoted when I get back from leave. I'm really paranoid that somehow this woman is going to get my new promotion/job instead of me! Anyone else have good or bad experiences with maternity leave cover situations?

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    Tags: Financial Services Industry, Maternity leave, Wealth Management
  • I am currently on FMLA and was set to return to work in 4 days, but was laid off today. The reason is "position elimination". What are my rights?

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    Tags: Discrimination, Maternity leave
  • I am trying to get back to work after being a caregiver for parent with Alzheimer's. Am dealing with horrible age bias/discrimination. Need help from exec-level professionals.

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    Tags: Discrimination, Mentors, Request for Help
  • I've worked with this company for over a year but got a promotion about 2 months ago. During that two months, it was announced that the other women in my department is pregnant. The whole time I was pregnant too, just had no idea. It is possible that our leave time will lapse each other. Any advice for when I tell my boss?

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    Tags: Pregnancy at Work
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    You don't owe your boss any explanation or excuse. I'm sure he/she may be frustrated -- but you're totally within your rights. So you may want to start with some humor: "Boss, I don't know -- I'm afraid we have a problem. There must be something in the water." Do NOT apologize for being pregnant. But do offer up your willingness to contribute to a plan of how the organization will handle all these overlapping leaves. Maternity leave cover? Intern? and let your boss know you will help him/her find the people and train them.

  • Would you look for a new job during your maternity leave and still nursing? My current workplace has a great lactation room. Easily accessible and provides an onsite pump. There is also the possibility that my employer will allow me to WFH one or two days a week when I return. However, I know I won't last long in this company due to stress and the hours. Should I stay and try to get by for as long as I can or is being on maternity leave a great time to go on interviews?

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    Tags: Changing careers, Job search, Maternity leave
  • Trying to start a women's group at my company - has anyone done this recently and what would you suggest for best practices?

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    Tags: Career advice, Diversity best practices, Networking
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    We have one at my company and I was instrumental in spearheading its inception. It's a positive contribution to company culture because it gives women an outlet for this type of conversation during working hours (a lot are working mothers and don't have the flexibility to network after work). One downside is that you're so familiar with everybody that it's hard to say who's telling the truth during the really hard and interesting conversations. An additional challenge is getting people to take on the task of programming while not making it seem like "more work". If you can have a group of 3-4 people who are seriously committed to the project, it can definitely work.

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    I've been involved for close to two years in my company's women's resource group, Women@Groupon, but it was started shortly before I came on board.

    Partially echoing the others, here are three things to do to start one:

    1) Get an executive/leader of the company on board. This person can be any gender, and can help make your group's voice louder when pushing certain initiatives or asking for funding for events and programming.

    2) Start small, and see how you grow. Set up a recurring lunch between you and a small group of women, and encourage each person to bring someone new each time. Your group will inevitably grow, and you'll meet more people!

    3) Create a Google Calendar to add events to for the group, which people can subscribe to and RSVP for. You can alter the settings of the calendar so that only certain people can add events, or anyone can, depending on the level of openness you're going for. Use this calendar for lunches, happy hours, external networking events, and more. Sometimes, the difference between someone attending an outside event is simply having a colleague to go, too!

    Good luck!

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    We have one at my company. The company is fairly large.
    I wasn't involved in the inception, but it just started as a google group. It was not official, but gave us a place to connect with other women in the company. Then they started having luncheons to meet face to face. There are no men involved in our group.
    I guess it depends on what your goals are, but I like having a space to connect with other women (I'm a software developer and work with 5 men under my male supervisor).

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    I haven't started one but in my group, I notice that these things are great: 1) Involve men / invite them to participate so it doesn't become an echo chamber and you can get some more company-wide support, 2) Get some great speakers so there's a "reason" to attend events, 3) Allow for women to connect with each other offline, e.g. an email list serve

  • I was laid off in November of last year from a very overbearing tyrant boss. The main issue for me was being asked to go against the company policies as well as what is legally proper (I am a real estate attorney). I do not want to return to the industry I was in but cannot seem to find any company that is willing to give me a chance. I have applied for positions that only require a high school diploma just to get my foot in the door but to date no one in HR seems to appreciate that to give me a phone call to discuss my credentials or why I am applying. Does anyone have any suggestions? I am willing to move too. Right now I am disheartened that my law degree counts for nothing and that I cannot even get a human to reach out to me but only automated emails.

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    Tags: Changing careers, Job search, Request for Help
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    Try a job fair, that way you are seen in person. This made things different for me.

  • I work in finance and I'm trying to make a career change into a startup in a non-financial role. Has anyone else done this and do you have any advice for me?

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    Tags: Career advice, Changing careers
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    I wouldn't obsess over whether you got a finance role in the startup -- it's easier to make a move out of finance once you are at the startup -- I would be patient and think about it taking 2 steps to make a really big career change.

  • I'm not sure when to tell my boss I'm pregnant. When did you guys do it? Any suggestions?

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    Tags: Career advice, Pregnancy at Work
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    Wait as long as possible. I had responsibilities taken away from me "because I will be going on leave." I waited until 16 weeks. Wish I had waited until 20-24 weeks.

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    Wait as long as possible so long as you're feeling good.

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    I did it when I was 12 weeks along.

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