Expeditors International www.expeditors.com

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We crowdsource Expeditors International's maternity, paternity and parental leave policies, based on Expeditors International's employee reviews and anonymous tips from Expeditors International employees.

Expeditors International Maternity and Paternity Leave Policies

Expeditors International offers 20 weeks of paid maternity leave, 0 weeks of unpaid maternity leave, 12 weeks of paid paternity leave and 8 weeks of unpaid paternity leave. This information is based on anonymous tips submitted by employees.

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  • 6 Median
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  • 6 Median
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  • ? Unknown - please leave a tip
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Transportation: Freight & Logistics Maternity and Paternity Leave

How many weeks of paid maternity, unpaid maternity, paid paternity and unpaid paternity leave do employers in the Transportation: Freight & Logistics industry offer?

  • Median Average
  • 6 4
  • 12 10
  • 2 1
  • 0 0

Maternity Leaves Taken at Expeditors International

  • Lady Grandma 0 weeks paid 12 weeks unpaid

Expeditors International Maternity Leave Comments

  • "This is for CHQ-IS of Expeditors International, in Seattle, Wa and does not include work environment at Expeditors branches or the CHQ business side. The IS department is getting more even, gender-wise, over time. There are many women in a variety of positions in IS, including QA, developers, supervisors, project managers, managers, and higher. Several of the product executives are women as well. The work environment is fairly low stress (depending on deadlines), supportive, collaborative, and decidedly non-'brogrammer'. I have not experienced any gender-based discrimination thus far in my three years here. I have noticed several women go through pregnancies, go on leave, then come back and continue working, though I haven't talked with them about it. I do know of a few cases of women deciding to quit to stay home with children, but do not think that was company-related, more their choice. The vacation policy is not as progressive as many tech companies. You get 2 weeks (no rollover) starting, go to 3 weeks at 3 years, 4 weeks at 10. There is no flex-time option as yet, though employee demand has management considering it and they have promised a decision by the end of 2015. The maternity leave policy is a little tricky to understand, but is a little more generous than other states because Washington is covered under both the state's Family Leave Act (12 weeks) and a required pregnancy disability leave (6 weeks). That gives you at least 18 weeks for maternity leave because the FLA doesn't kick in until after pregnancy disability leave ends, and depending on your recovery period, you might get more disability leave. As for getting paid during leave, you must use any accrued paid time off to do so. That means vacation and any sick days you have. Once those are gone, if you've added short term disability to your insurance benefits, you can use that to get a percentage of your usual salary. (more info here: http://lni.wa.gov/WorkplaceRights/files/FamilyLeaveFAQs.pdf) As for other parent leave, Washington State's FLA also covers partners, so they can take 12 weeks unpaid leave as well. The only hitch is if both you and your partner work for the same company and you child is healthy, then you have to share those 12 weeks, you don't get a combined 24." - Lady Dev
  • "Maternity leave here is not great like many other American companies, but there seems to be a good number of women for an IS department. I've never felt discriminated against on my teams and I see women in leadership positions. As a woman, I don't feel like I'm treated any differently at this employer. However, I would aim for a tech company if you're looking for good maternity leave policies. Work-life balance is great though." - rainicorn

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