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Questions about Salary Expectations | Fairygodboss
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Sheila Senescall
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54
6
25 Comments
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Maggie Wolff
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60
I've learned my lesson in the past when I didn't do my salary research, and ended up lowballing myself. Now I always make sure I'm prepared for this conversation. Because even if they share their salary info first, I need to be prepared to reply back if that is in line with what I'm looking for. There are tons of sites out there that will provide you with a general idea of your market rate - Glassdoor, Payscale, Salary dot com, LinkedIn, etc. For big companies you can usually find out via Glassdoor what their salary range is for the job you're interviewing for. I also talk to trusted colleagues and former bosses and any contacts/mentors in my industry. Additionally, I talk to any recruiter who reaches out to me because at the very least I can either get more intel on their salary range, or test out different salary expectations on them to gauge their response. Similar to another comment, I also kept track of whatever salary information I shared or learned during my job search. Whenever I was pushed to give a number, I never shared my current salary, even if that's what they asked for, I always replied with my expectations instead. I always gave a big range. The low end of the range was the minimum salary I would consider. Never give a minimum lower than what you would happily accept because there is a good chance they will offer you your minimum. The high end of the range was the highest amount I found via research for that job title in my city. My range was anywhere from $20 - 25k difference, but at least it was something. For all I know, recruiters just documented the low end as my expected salary and ignored the high end, but at least I felt like that still gave me leverage to negotiate if we got to the offer stage. I wish recruiters were all in the practice of just sharing the salary range or midpoint of the job in question and asking if that's in line with what I'm looking for, and never asking for my number. Doing it that way makes me think the company values their employees and wants to pay them what they are worth. Pushing me to name my price first makes me think they just want to find the cheapest talent possible and doesn't give me a good impression of the company overall.
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Anonymous
I just had this happen. Finally, the HR lady said, “I have to put a number in the box.” Then she had to fill in the box about what part I wanted as bonus vs base salary!
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Joanna Poe
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273
I tell them I don't discuss previous or current salaries because it only serves to exacerbate the gender wage gap. I then say I generally expect an offer commensurate with my experience but will take into account a broad spectrum of non-monetary compensation.
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Lisabeth A. Sarin
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12
Career Contessa posted a great reply (paraphrased here) "What I'm looking for in compensation is to be paid at a level commensurate with the responsibilities of the role, that is on par with my peers and competitive in the marketplace. I also understand that compensation is more than just salary, so I'm looking at the total package".
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Kelley
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Higher Education professional in Upstate NY
I don’t recommend giving your salary history. It’s not necessary and in some states/cities it has become illegal to ask this question of prospective new hires (check out the laws in your location). Instead I would recommend doing a little research at the time you apply. I tend to keep track of my information on a spreadsheet including the salary mentioned in the job posting (if available). It’s probably also a good idea to add information about salary based on what type of job it is and the location (use sites like Glassdoor to get an idea). This way you have something to offer if the question of expected salary comes up. Something that works for you and is also within reason of the position and industry.
User edited comment on 11/24/20 at 3:34PM UTC
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Matt Warzel
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My advice is to make sure you leverage into the conversation your skills and values (if they do) match each line of the job description. And since typical job descriptions are so massive, they can usually include 2 roles, you should showcase that and use it during salary negotiations. "If you want me to handle all X of these duties, that's going to cost you!" - obviously be professional about it and ready to backup your case that you do indeed match each and every line. Typically candidates who are a 100% match are known as purple squirrels, i.e., hard to find! Keep that in mind!
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Denise
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315
Contracts & Accounting Manager
I work for a small business and have only been doing the recruiting for less than a year, but we have agreed internally that it saves a lot of time if we just post the salary range when we post the position. We do get a lot of resumes from people who aren't qualified, but we also don't waste a lot of time interviewing highly qualified people who expect a much higher salary than we can pay. The first question we ask when screening candidates is whether or not they noted the salary range before they applied.
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Lily Galarneau
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Product Analyst in CT
A lot of people hate those conversations, however, come prepared... do your research for comparable jobs in your area (both location and expertise) Give them a range, and also explain why you are WORTH what you are asking for, and what you bring to the table. If it's a similar role in about the same location (city-wise) add a couple thousand to your asking price.... they can always counter offer and meet you half-way.
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JYJ
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Your previous salary has nothing to do with the job they have. Always remember this.
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Anonymous
I came to say the same as another anonymous poster - it is unlawful for recruiters to ask what you made previously. As a recruiter, I ask candidates what salary range they're targeting as they search for a new position. Usually, they'll come forward and say something like "well, in my last role, I was making 80K and since this role is a people manager, I'd expect some additional responsibilities, so I'm targeting 85K+." Or if they're relocating, they can show that they researched the company and location they're moving to by saying something like "Since I'll be moving from San Francisco to Omaha, I'm willing to majorly adjust my salary expectations to match the cost of living. I'm targeting around 90 - 105K base salary for this position. Does that align with the company's budget for the role?" Coming prepared for this question is a must when having a phone screen with a recruiter. Please do your research and it makes it easy for both of us! It's also okay to mention that you you did the research but realize things can vary greatly by company and industry - you can still ask first what range the company is willing to pay for the role.
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