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Given weekend to think over severance | Fairygodboss
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MJ
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306
Accounting consultant
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25 Comments
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Anonymous
You could do what some of the rest of us that currently work in the accounting industry have done when we've lost jobs, which is go to work for yourself. I 'm self-employed as a bookkeeper/accountant (non-CPA), and I'm much happier now then I have ever been. I'm also much healthier, too. Working for myself allows me to pick the type of clients that I want to work with, set my own hours, and let's me set my own pricing based on what is considered standard and acceptable for my area. It might be that you do better as a temp worker because you get enough variety, which you currently aren't getting in your current position. Which would also mean that you'd probably do really well in working for yourself, and you'd get plenty of variety. I took the plunge and went to work for myself, when I could no longer continue to work in retail which I loved due to having a major ankle injury that we initially thought was temporary but in reality was actually permanent and non-surgical. Going to work was never what I had planned for myself, however, it was obviously the best path for me given the situation at the time.
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Kimberly Mohr
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Take the severance and be sure to get letters of recommendation from your manager before you go.
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MJ
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306
Accounting consultant
Thank you everyone! Your good advice means alot to me. I am meeting via Zoom at noon and will keep you posted.
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barbg
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Keeping the job is not really an alternative if they have made a formal severance offer. You can quit and take the generous severance, or be let go a little later without it. Those are your real choices here. Take the severance, and file for unemployment would be my advice. You don't really have this job anymore.
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Heather Cutler
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@barbg - you are absolutely correct that this job is coming to an end! Try to negotiate for a higher severance and perhaps a letter of reference.
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Anonymous
I received a very similar offer from my employer, I was not happy with my job any more, I have 2 small children doing remote learning, and I was starting to loose productivity. My employer offered me a severance package and said they would not oppose my application for unemployment and suggested that I have a lawyer review it, which I did. The lawyer suggested a few provisions so that I could start getting unemployment as soon as I received my last pay check. I took the package and now a month and a half later I am so happy I did. I have been applying for jobs and have had an interview last week, which I am hopeful for. I would advise taking the offer, but asking them to give you time to have a lawyer review. Best of luck!
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Anonymous
Hi, thanks for sharing. What were the provisions that allowed for receiving unemployment as soon as you received your last check?
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Anonymous
The lawyer advised to get the severance as a lump sum up front, my original draft agreement had the payments broken out over two months. In my state (NY) you can't apply for unemployment insurance if you are still receiving severance payments. He also made sure that the verbal stipulation that my company would not oppose my unemployment claim was included in the written agreement. There were a few other minor items specific for my situation, but these were the two most helpful.
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Anonymous
I would take the severance. It’s extremely generous. And if you stay you may get fired. If you can afford to be out of work a while and find a new job easily, at least temping, there are so many people unemployed now due to the pandemic and all, nobody should think anything of it. If it were me I would simply say that circumstances changed and they made me an extremely generous severance offer which I figured would give me a chance to find my next great opportunity.
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JYJ
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1.36k
2 months severance after one year? That's rare. They clearly would like an amicable separation. Definitely have an employment lawyer review the terms. You want to ensure there are no restrictions on future employment in terms of who you can work for, etc... And depending on why this is all happening, you may be able to ask for more-another month of severance? extension of medical benefits? That on top of unemployment will give you a head start as you begin a new journey!
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MJ
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Accounting consultant
I am on my husband's med benefits so that's not an issue. I did like temping and did it on and off throughout my working life. Only problem with it is it pays poorly. Have considered in the past marketing myself as a consultant not through an agency. I do agree that 2 months severance is great. I am meeting via zoom with my boss and bosses boss at noon. We will see what happens. And thank you.
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JYJ
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1.36k
You are obviously a seasoned pro. I would absolutely cut out the "middle man" with agencies and apply directly to the companies that need you. Then you keep the entire hourly rate instead of continuing with poor compensation. You got this!!
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Jennifer Kronstain
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I agree with Gretchen’s approach. I may even ask for one more month along with the reference. That sounds like an opening offer to me. Worst they could say is no.
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Gretchen Osterman
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A committed higher education professional
I would take the severance. Also ask for a good reference so you can find placement without a concern about this past position hanging over your head.
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MJ
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306
Accounting consultant
Thanks all. The idea of severance is enticing, but would I be able to find another job? It was hard enough as a temp looking for work. When I would get an interview all they were interested in was why past jobs ended. Age is another stigma (mid 50s) that makes it difficult.
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Saidah Abdulhaqq
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Digital Strategist Marketing Technologist Coach
There are several sites available for 50+ professionals seeking work. There's a market for long-term professionals who are looking simply to work and need an assist due to age bias. seniorjobbank.org workforce50.com careeronestop.org seniorliving.org Glassdoor and Indeed also have articles that lead to listings. Such a tidy severance is likely due to age because they would have to *prove* you couldn't do your job to fire you outright. The HR department will allow your management to perform a witch hunt for every little error and then fire with cause and no severance. This sets them in good position to not be sued since they proved you had performance issues and that it was not due to age. I would take (and have taken) the money and move on. They often offer placement assistance and references, as well as coaching in cases like these. If that is not already a part of the package, negotiate it.
User edited comment on 11/23/20 at 4:03PM UTC
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Dorothy Byrne
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I must thank you for this input too. I am going through a work situation exactly as you described with a witch hunt to distract from my age being the issue. It's caused me so much anxiety but you are reconfirming that I am not crazy!
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Anonymous
Of you really feel there is an ageism issue you should seek and employment attorney and negotiate. I had pregnancy discrimination and I got a year of salary.
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Saidah Abdulhaqq
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Digital Strategist Marketing Technologist Coach
You are absolutely NOT crazy. They do all they can to distract from the idea that they want to hire someone younger (often cheaper) because of perceived inabilities due to age. Rather than train the people they have who know the business due to longevity, they will hire people who know the tech and hope they stay longer than 1-2 years. HR is usually complicit as they have the business' interests in mind ahead of yours. In a company like that, I say do your search, find a new job, and take severance only after negotiating for more money, placement assistance, and career coaching. Get what they should have given you as an employee and let someone who appreciates your age benefit from it. Breathe easy knowing it's not you. Release that anxiety and get what you're owed for the time you spent giving your all. Been there, done that.
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