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Over 50 and underemployed | Fairygodboss
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Michele Hell
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19
Fly In The Ointment Since 1966
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Anonymous
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Have as many recent skills and learnings on your resume as possible. Unfortunately, many older candidates and employees I've had fall into stereotypes around technology, software and related management tasks. While it is not true of every candidate, so many cannot use Excel, Powerpoint, G-Suite, and in my company, my last 3 over-50 hires all proved to need tremendous handholding in the field. That gives me a bias now when I'm looking at a recent grad compared to an established person. I can teach someone how to follow our policy and perform according to our playbook. I don't have time to teach you how to use the printer every time you have to print something. So what I look for on a resume is a lot of clear tech skill - it could be attending webinars about trends, it could be straight software that you've used, could be a discussion of tech related skills that you have used in a job.
Deborah Frincke
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134
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Agism is definitely a thing - but - we sometimes play into it. Your resume and life can be vibrant or stagnant at any age. There are so many things I can do easily now that were impossible early career! My gray and my 30 years of experience post PhD are badges of honor. I am sure that is true for you as well. Let your resume and your life show you are continually learning and taking on challenges, and highlight those hard earned skills that have brought you to where you are. And, don't forget to give back. Mentoring and supporting others is another way to stay energized.
Maureen
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54
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I agree with the volunteering and mentoring. I am a Score mentor and I firmly believe my volunteer experience helped me get my new position. Helping a small company grow. Those were the skills they were interested in and I had 8 years of volunteer work in the area to supplement my professional experience.
Kari Solomon
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67
Resume Writing | LinkedIn | Job Search Coaching
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True now for anyone job seeking, but especially for those also dealing with any types of hiring biases (ageism, care-giver bias, etc.), you need to network your butt off. Yes, your resume is going to have to be ATS-friendly, but you are going to need someone to go to bat for you and get your resume in front of the right people.
Michele Hell
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19
Fly In The Ointment Since 1966
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Thanks to the community for the great advice and encouragement- I recently started coming to this site regularly and find FairyGodBoss to be a great bunch of supportive people! Thank you once again!
Laura Heian
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15
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Use any volunteering you're doing to your advantage. List it on LinkedIn. Mention the projects you're doing for the not for profit's in your work interviews as the skills relate.
Jacquelin Lalor
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55
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It would be interesting to know if there are opportunities for growth at your current company. Sometimes expressing a desire for increased or new responsibilities can help management see you in a different light.
Brooke Davidson Hoareau
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82
Transforming UX for exceptional results
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I also recommend if you haven’t already to reach out to some recruitment agencies and see if you can get assistance with your search. It doesn’t cost you, just the employer. Personally I have found that helps me get an advocate to push me to the top of the pile.
Anonymous
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I feel the same, hear over and over my skills are great and interview well but..... I really wish companies realized at 57 I am seeking my final career step, I'll give them a solid 10+ years if they give me an opportunity. I am not 30 and building my career I have no desire to keep switching jobs any longer.
Laura Heian
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15
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My mother was in your shoes in the 80s and found that role at Wells Fargo. Maybe look for a lateral move to a larger company?
Maureen
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54
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I would also say look at companies that have a number of people over 40 or 50 years of age employed there so you dont become the "oldest" person in the room. You want to go to a company that is fine with the age. Just try to find a place that is not going to make a big deal out of your age. Yes, I am 61 and was unemployed for a while during the pandemic. I start my new job on Nov 30th. Yes...it can happen but wow...does it take time. Have faith.
Dorothy Hutson
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17
Solutions focused results-driven senior leader
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This is a difficult time to find a job. As a woman over 60 I am struggling as well. I did follow the advice, and will pass it along as well, to get a desired certification or training in an area that is in demand for your area of expertise. I obtained my Project Management Professional (PMP) certification. This seems to have opened more doors even though I have over 20 years of experience.