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Stop Ageism In The Workplace. Share your thoughts about age discrimination below. | Fairygodboss
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Mimi Bishop
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1.3k
Biz+Life Coach for GenX Women (and Millennials)
Ageism is alive and well. Getting back into the workforce, staying in it or getting ahead is more difficult. Here are a few tips to help manage: 1. Start with thoroughly assessing your skills and experience. Get clear on how your contribution can enhance a bottom line by generating revenue, saving costs, creating efficiencies, enhancing product development or user experience. Be specific and quantify as much as possible. 2. Present yourself as someone who loves to learn, continues to grow and is adaptable. Talk about your long-term career objectives and goals. 3. Show that you're savvy. Yes, you need to be as digitally savvy as possible. This means updating your LinkedIn and even more, engaging on it. Write posts, leave thoughtful comments. 4. Make friends across generations. Networks matter and smart networking will get you in the door a lot faster than responding to help wanted posts. 5. Mind your mindset. It is harder as you get older, yes, but it is not impossible.
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Anonymous
It goes both ways. I’ve been in situations where there’s an unspoken expectation that I defer to older colleagues even though we have different but related skill sets. It’s annoying.
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Anonymous
Agreed.
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Anonymous
I’m still early in my career and I think about this a lot. In my job I tend to see those a bit older surpassed by younger individuals who may be faster with technology and who find new ways to do things. I like to emphasize the experience and knowledge of those around me and support anyone who may just need help in excel or a new tool. I’m trying to separate myself by building knowledge to become a subject matter expert in the future. But who knows what may happen. Does anyone have advice on how to make a difference for those around you when you’re not in a leadership role?
User edited comment on 08/06/20 at 4:16AM UTC
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Mimi Bishop
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1.3k
Biz+Life Coach for GenX Women (and Millennials)
I'm so glad to see that you are actively making a difference here. As a coach who works with Gen X women, I thank you! Can you tell me more about what you mean by separating yourself by building knowledge to become a subject matter expert? Is there an opportunity for you to do a series of lunch and learn presentations at your organization open to anyone who would like to expand a specific skill?
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Anonymous
Hi! What I mean by building knowledge is that my work sort of has 2 advancement opportunities, 1 - become manager and work your way up or 2 - become subject matter expert that then advises others and does cold eyes reviews of projects. I’m not sure if I will be able to go the manager route but even if I do my thought is if I can single myself out as a subject matter expert then in the future it may help explain why my salary would be higher than someone younger who on paper seems to be able to do all the same work. Yes, I love a good lunch and learn and I’ve done a few in the past. That is a great reminder and something to think about for new topics, thank you!
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Anonymous
Great ideas for those who are in that position. My strong work ethics has helped me of performing my job harder and smarter than my younger colleagues. I don’t socialize much during work hours either.
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Anonymous
Have a conversation with those who are around you about the subject.
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Anonymous
Thanks for posting this. Ageism is insidious, it sidelines many capable people, and be assured that it might affect you— even if you think it never will. Here’s what ageism is like: you apply for jobs for which you are extremely well qualified— and you receive no response. Repeatedly. Or you do receive a response: you’re “overqualified” or you “don’t fit in the org chart.” You know that you’re performing extremely well— far better than you did earlier in your career, but it doesn’t make a difference. Or you’re turned down for roles that you’ve performed capably in the past. I was shocked when this began to happy to me during my 50s. And I felt— and still feel— extremely guilty and embarrassed, because I’d blithely chucked resumes when I was younger on the grounds that the candidate was overqualified. Now I realize that they might have needed a new job and might have performed superbly in the role. My message for those in their 20s and 30s: 20 to 30 years in the workplace passes quickly. Unless you are one of the few who has an extremely stable job (increasingly rare in the modern economy) or unless you are one of the top people running a successful enterprise (and we all can’t all be at the top of the pyramid), the probability is that you’ll be 50 or older and looking for a new role. Better to eliminate ageism now, so that it doesn’t sabotage you later.
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Anonymous
Agreed with everything which you stated. Think that overqualified is part of the problem when mature candidates who quit applying for positions that they match and are being passed up then move onto another position which they are too experienced for. Was at my employment for 20 years when I was let go in 2011 which I finally found stable employment 1200 miles away.
User edited comment on 08/06/20 at 12:28PM UTC
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