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“The average person puts only 25% of his energy and ability into his work. The world takes off its hat to those who put in more than 50% of their capacity, and stands on its head for those few and far between souls who devote 100%.” Andrew Carnegie Free course: http://interview-u.thinkific.com/courses/how-to-communicate-with-confidence-and-credibility | Fairygodboss
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Confident Career Woman
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Peg Bittner
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retired auditor now into volunteering
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I have to make a comment about the interview gig. I have been on many over the years and have had many really strange ones to match. And that is my point. The person who is hunting for a job goes through all this prep work with the "perfect wardrobe" they hope, the best haircut, that does not look like they just got their hair cut. Spent hundreds of hours and dollars to create the epitome of resumes and cover letter. They have been rehearsing their entry, their language and has investigated the company extensively before the "big day" The day that controls their entire life. Meanwhile the person in HR is just going through their day, either planning their lunchtime or just getting back. Used some mouthwash, cleaned up a little, brushed their hair, then grabbed their interview folder and met with the candidate. The candidate is shaking like a leaf, trying to moisten their mouth and throat and say hello professionally. Let the interview game begin! Why do we have to go through this one sided ritual. Both sides know going in that the person looking for a job and the interviewer will not be acting like that in the everyday work situation, so why do it now? Why not just sit down in a relaxed setting and just start learning about the person and the company. The candidate most likely will not have too many questions the way interviews go now. Wait until they are home an hour or two and they probably have a list of them. In the relaxed set-up the questions would come to mind freely with no stress. Just imagine how many antacids would not be taken if interviews were more relaxed instead of a Oscar performance
Confident Career Woman
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Great perspective Peg. Some companies do offer a more “relaxed” approach to interviews but at the end of the day, I tell my clients to control what they can control - their perspective, their preparation and their “performance.” The interview is a conversation that leads to compensation. Unfortunately a part of the problem is interviewing is a skill that isn’t taught but the expectation is individuals will do it well.
Peg Bittner
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retired auditor now into volunteering
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Also, the fact is both sides have to count on the other side is explaining everything truthfully and not holding important information back. I have had experiences where I was interviewed, the job was presented as if was a good fit for me, offer to me and I accepted based on what was said and when I started it turned out to be completly different. At one place I left after a week, another place three months. Interviews are one sided. You have all the cards and know how to play them, job seekers are to worried about how they look, how they will answer the very unique interview questions about scenerios that I have never seen occur, and worry about how they answer them and all other questions. Next time you interview place yourself in the job seekers seat while talking to them.
Confident Career Woman
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What type of questions did you ask to ensure the culture would work well for you?