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Employee Reviews
(Winged ratings measure job satisfaction on scale of 1 to 5)
Anonymous Review Image
"If you join, build up a network of supportive female professionals. Don't trust HR. Don't fill out polls or surveys. Just do your job unbelievably well, and you will slowly rise to a point When it is time to move on because you hit the glass ceiling, do that. Try moving around every two to three years to resist "tracking" and growing stale. It can be hard to move around, but with determination you can usually pull it off."
Overall Job Satisfaction:
3.0
Are women & men treated equally?
"No"
One thing Microsoft can improve?
"Promote more women into leadership positions"
Recent Salary
$100k-$150k
Recent Bonus
$20k-$50k
Work-Life Friendly Attributes:
Policies
Did you take Maternity leave?
"No"
"That was a long time ago I took maternity leave. Today Microsoft has one of the best, considerably extended, maternity leaves in the industry. They also now encourage men to take paternal leave, which I've noticed is really changing the attitude among men towards the time away--they appreciate it and judge women less harshly for taking time away. I had great managers and no consequences for leaving for maternity leave, but I now hear varying stories from the women. My theory is this is mostly due to crushing metrics coming in over the past six years. Stepping away for this leave seems to inevitably lead to reviews (for both men and women) that complain about your "lack of impact" and the sudden rise of vague statements about how you are falling short, but in ways where you cannot figure out how to correct the perceived problem."
Would you recommend Microsoft to other women?
"It depends. Microsoft has good benefits for women, and can be relatively family friendly, but only in narrow roles where women are traditionally in the majority, such as in HR, marketing, etc. If you are a young woman with technical qualifications and no family, it is a wonderful place to get started, with interesting and challenging projects. But when it comes to promoting engineers, older women with families have a hard time rising. Seeing this, 2-5 years down the road, the younger female engineers tend to walk out as a result, or move to much "softer" roles. Women are very poorly represented in the upper reaches of Product Groups and especially in certain areas of the Services (field facing, customer facing) branches. Metrics rule, except when it comes to measuring the more embarrassing aspects, such as the technical numbers and their spread in various groups. Those metrics are also often brutal towards women, ignoring the impact of often useless or nonsensical travel, celebrating high numbers of hours over great work, brushing past the limits of extending work into personal lives, and passing over the particular challenges that female engineers have in the IT Industry. D&I initiatives are driven by HR with very little understanding of these differences in women's experiences across the company, and ironically tend to lead to confirming instead of countering the worst views of women: weak, incompetent, just not ready to perform. At its best, Microsoft is a wonderful place for women to work--for a time. Male peers are usually good to great to work with, but management seems afraid of women and over-controls through HR, putting women in boxes they cannot get out of easily, and failing to be fully accountable for slow progress at the top tiers. At its worst, Microsoft is very, very tough, but probably no worse than anywhere else in the IT Industry."
Anonymous Review Image
"I wouldn't say it's any front leader but offers decent options. "
Overall Job Satisfaction:
3.0
Are women & men treated equally?
"Yes"
One thing Microsoft can improve?
"Improve my compensation"
Recent Salary
$0-$25k
Recent Bonus
$0
Work-Life Friendly Attributes:
Culture
Did you take Maternity leave?
"No"
Would you recommend Microsoft to other women?
"Yes"
Anonymous Review Image
"Great place to work. Flexibility and great culture. Women treated the same as men."
Overall Job Satisfaction:
5.0
Are women & men treated equally?
"Yes"
One thing Microsoft can improve?
"Not much; it's a great place to work"
Recent Salary
$100k-$150k
Recent Bonus
$10k-$20k
Work-Life Friendly Attributes:
Hours, Culture, Policies
Did you take Maternity leave?
"No"
Would you recommend Microsoft to other women?
"Yes"
Anonymous Review Image
"I would encourage young women to work here, because it is great when you are early career. I would recommend mid-career and later to go elsewhere."
Overall Job Satisfaction:
3.0
Are women & men treated equally?
"No"
One thing Microsoft can improve?
"Promote more women into leadership positions"
Recent Salary
>$150k
Recent Bonus
$20k-$50k
Did you take Maternity leave?
"Yes"
12 Paid | 0 Unpaid
Would you recommend Microsoft to other women?
"I would encourage young women to work here, because it is great when you are early career. I would recommend mid-career and later to go elsewhere."
Anonymous Review Image
"Benefits are fantastic. The impact of the software we build is immense. I've been working hard and I've been getting promoted at a relatively fast rate too. It took me a long time to reach a point where I was unhappy with my job, and initially I didn't know why I was unhappy. After I admitted to myself that gender might be playing a role, I've been doing some soul-searching and I now feel that I deserve better. I am looking for something better. Some women seem to be on teams they love. I haven't heard many of those stories, though. Microsoft is doing a bunch of public talking around diversity. Microsoft is walking some of the talk, but overall there's too much talking and not enough walking."
Overall Job Satisfaction:
3.0
Are women & men treated equally?
"Yes"
One thing Microsoft can improve?
"At this point what angers me most is that HR is blocking grassroots efforts around improving diversity. When women raise very legitimate concerns we get lectured on all the stuff HR is doing. HR talks down to us. If I felt like HR actually cared about us and was genuinely listening to us I'd be significantly less frustrated."
Position or Department
Software Engineer 2,
Recent Salary
$100k-$150k
Recent Bonus
$10k-$20k
Work-Life Friendly Attributes:
Hours, Culture, Policies
Did you take Maternity leave?
"No"
Would you recommend Microsoft to other women?
"Pay, promotions, performance evaluations, etc. seem to be fair. Benefits are great. If you ignore the company culture, everything is pretty awesome. The culture is hostile to women. Microsoft is trying to change. Some efforts are happening. But those efforts haven't trickled down to the bottom ranks yet. At a recent women's event with a Q&A section, a woman almost got a standing ovation after she asked when we'd finally be seeing some sort of effort to get most of the male ICs / low-level managers involved in diversity efforts. My manager has been very understanding and has been making changes. Two male ICs on my team are showing interest. But there's no momentum from the team at large. During a lunch conversation a couple weeks ago I was asked if I've figured out how to cook for my husband yet. HR is actively discouraging grassroots efforts around identifying sexism and educating male coworkers. Data and progress is only tracked at the highest 2 levels of the company. Fortunately HR isn't actively blocking or even participating in diversity-related conversations that occur in places with a large audience, e.g. our internal Yammer site. So places with large audiences are your best bet... Recently there was a rather embarrassing viral incident around sexy dancing girls dressed in school uniforms performing at a corporate-sponsored party at GDC. The internal investigation concluded that nobody had bad intentions, and the root cause was over-delegation / outsourcing with too little oversight. No company policies had been violated (What?!?) and from what I could tell there were no serious consequences for any employee involved in the incident."
Anonymous Review Image
"It's hard watching your male co-workers get promoted while you're told that you're not doing enough."
Overall Job Satisfaction:
1.0
Are women & men treated equally?
"No"
One thing Microsoft can improve?
"Promote more women into leadership positions"
Position or Department
Senior Software Development Engineer,
Recent Salary
>$150k
Recent Bonus
$0-$10k
Work-Life Friendly Attributes:
Policies
Did you take Maternity leave?
"No"
Would you recommend Microsoft to other women?
"No"
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