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The Job Hunt
4 Ways to Slash Your Resume Down to One Page
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Jane Burnett via The Ladders
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Slicing off bits of your resume in order to keep it to one page can be so tough. When you’ve accomplished a lot in your career, it can be difficult to pick what to remove — so here’s what to cut out.

Say goodbye to super-old positions

It’s just not worth keeping them around.

Kim Isaacs, a resume expert for Monster and founder of Advanced Career Systems, writes on Monster’s website that you should “eliminate old experience.”

“Employers are most interested in what you did recently. If you have a long career history, focus on the last 10 to 15 years. If your early career is important to your current goal, briefly mention the experience without including details. For example: Early Career: ABC Company — City, State — Assistant Store Manager and Clerk, 1980-1985,” she writes.

Watch your wording

This can make a big difference.

Lily Zhang, Manager of Graduate Student Professional Development at the MIT Media Lab, writes in The Muse that you should “shorten bullets.”

“Your bullet points are really the meat of your resume. This is where you actually talk about your experience. To ensure that people actually read them, absolutely do not let them trail on to a third line. Two lines max, but preferably one,” she writes. “To decide between one or two lines, use your space efficiently. If your bullet is one line, plus a little bit that dangles onto the next, find a way to condense your language down. Ultimately, you’re going for a dangler-free resume.”

Don’t include this line — it’s unnecessary

Pay close attention to this advice.

Alison Doyle, an author, career expert and founder and CEO of CareerToolBelt.comwrites in The Balance that you should “skip the references.”

“It’s not necessary to say ‘references available upon request’ on your resume. It’s understood that you will provide references, if required, as part of the job application process,” she writes.

Choose the right examples

This is key.

Marcelle Yeager, president of Career Valet and co-founder of ServingTalentwrites in U.S. News & World Report that you should “filter out responsibilities.”

“Employers can likely find almost exact replicas of your job descriptions by doing a Google search for your job titles. It’s your responsibility to tell them more of your story and what you are capable of,” she writes. “Replace your laundry list of duties with specific examples and the impact of your work. This is what is going to get you noticed.”

This article originally appeared on The Ladders.

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