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BY Avery Blank

How to Get Promoted: 5 Things To Do While Your Boss Is Away

Summer work

Photo credit: Creative Commons

TAGS: Career goals, Career advice, Career development

Your manager’s time away from the office is your opportunity to demonstrate your leadership in his or her absence and gain respect that will position yourself for a promotion. Use these five steps to get you promotion-ready by the time your manager returns from vacation.

1. Identify your manager’s expectations and priorities before she leaves.

Do not let your manager leave for vacation until you have had the opportunity to meet with her and discuss her priorities and expectations. Understand what she wants completed and by when. In addition to her expectations, ask about her priorities. This will help you understand the bigger picture, how your responsibilities achieve greater organizational goals and what matters to your manager.

Consider writing up and sending your manager a short (no more than one page) document identifying the projects and tasks that you have been asked to complete to ensure you are both on the same page. Also, identify an emergency line of communication. Agree on what word(s) to include in the subject line of an email to alert her of an emergency. If there is an emergency related to delivering on one of your tasks, know how to best get a hold of your manager while she is out of the office.

Sitting down with your manager and clearly communicating each other’s needs helps to avoid misunderstandings, builds trust and confidence, and fosters productivity, all of which indicate effective leadership.

2. Speak up about the resources you will need.

When you know your manager’s expectations and priorities, you must tell your manager what you need in order to complete your projects and meet expectations. Do you need an extra teammate? Do you need access to information? Managers are sometimes unaware of what is necessary to get the job done. It is your responsibility to communicate what you need to be able to achieve your manager’s goals.

Leaders are judged based on whether they satisfy expectations. If you do not speak up for what you need, you may run the risk of not being able to fulfill your obligations and lose out on the opportunity to demonstrate your leadership.

3. Manage people, and show them you can lead.

When your manager is on vacation, step up when you can be a resource. An important role of a leader is managing people. Do not take over your manager’s role. Rather, place yourself in a position to offer help. Seize the opportunity to communicate with your colleagues and provide guidance. Make sure they have what they need to move forward with their work. Ask questions, and take the time to get to know your colleagues and their goals. If they see you taking a sincere interest in them and their development, it can inspire them to become advocates for you and support your career advancement by speaking up when you are being considered for a promotion.

4. Exceed your manager’s expectations.

If you can exceed your manager’s expectations, do it. How do you exceed expectations? In meeting with your manager before he left, you have noted her priorities. You can use this information to surpass expectations and further your manager’s priorities.

Your manager says, for example, that she expects you to write and post two blog posts for the company’s website while she is away. In meeting with her before she left for vacation, she also shared with you that one of her organizational priorities is that the company starts being seen as a thought leader in the industry. To exceed expectations and help the company be seen as a thought leader, brainstorm and develop a strategy that will generate innovative content and get more people to read the blog.

Exceeding expectations is the sign of a leader. It will impress your manager, and it can inspire others to go above and beyond what they have been asked to do.

5. Debrief your manager.

Before your manager starts back at work, consider sending him a brief email with a high-level status update of your progress while he was on vacation. Meet with you manager in the first couple of days after he returns to go over details. (Consider scheduling this meeting even before he leaves town.)

This meeting with your manager is your opportunity to share what happened while he was away. If you accomplished a lot or had great success either individually or collectively, tell him. Do not devalue your accomplishments or rationalize your successes so they seem less meaningful. At the same time, tell your manager of any issues you encountered, how you managed them, and what you learned from such situations.

Debriefing your manager is an opportunity to shine but more importantly an opportunity to demonstrate your leadership. Leadership is not just about successes. Leadership is about handling challenges effectively that will inform future actions.

Is your manager on or about to leave for vacation? If you want to be promotion-ready by the time your manager returns, you have to demonstrate your leadership. Communicate effectively, manage people and projects, and exceed expectations.


Avery Blank is a millennial lawyer, strategist, and women’s advocate who helps others to strategically position and advocate for themselves to achieve their individual and organization goals. This article “Prep For A Promotion: 5 Ways To Step Up While Your Boss Is On Vacation This Summer” was originally published on Forbes. 

 

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Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women. 
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How to Get Promoted: 5 Things To Do While Your Boss Is Away

How to Get Promoted: 5 Things To Do While Your Boss Is Away

Your manager’s time away from the office is your opportunity to demonstrate your leadership in his or her absence and gain respect that will positio...

Your manager’s time away from the office is your opportunity to demonstrate your leadership in his or her absence and gain respect that will position yourself for a promotion. Use these five steps to get you promotion-ready by the time your manager returns from vacation.

1. Identify your manager’s expectations and priorities before she leaves.

Do not let your manager leave for vacation until you have had the opportunity to meet with her and discuss her priorities and expectations. Understand what she wants completed and by when. In addition to her expectations, ask about her priorities. This will help you understand the bigger picture, how your responsibilities achieve greater organizational goals and what matters to your manager.

Consider writing up and sending your manager a short (no more than one page) document identifying the projects and tasks that you have been asked to complete to ensure you are both on the same page. Also, identify an emergency line of communication. Agree on what word(s) to include in the subject line of an email to alert her of an emergency. If there is an emergency related to delivering on one of your tasks, know how to best get a hold of your manager while she is out of the office.

Sitting down with your manager and clearly communicating each other’s needs helps to avoid misunderstandings, builds trust and confidence, and fosters productivity, all of which indicate effective leadership.

2. Speak up about the resources you will need.

When you know your manager’s expectations and priorities, you must tell your manager what you need in order to complete your projects and meet expectations. Do you need an extra teammate? Do you need access to information? Managers are sometimes unaware of what is necessary to get the job done. It is your responsibility to communicate what you need to be able to achieve your manager’s goals.

Leaders are judged based on whether they satisfy expectations. If you do not speak up for what you need, you may run the risk of not being able to fulfill your obligations and lose out on the opportunity to demonstrate your leadership.

3. Manage people, and show them you can lead.

When your manager is on vacation, step up when you can be a resource. An important role of a leader is managing people. Do not take over your manager’s role. Rather, place yourself in a position to offer help. Seize the opportunity to communicate with your colleagues and provide guidance. Make sure they have what they need to move forward with their work. Ask questions, and take the time to get to know your colleagues and their goals. If they see you taking a sincere interest in them and their development, it can inspire them to become advocates for you and support your career advancement by speaking up when you are being considered for a promotion.

4. Exceed your manager’s expectations.

If you can exceed your manager’s expectations, do it. How do you exceed expectations? In meeting with your manager before he left, you have noted her priorities. You can use this information to surpass expectations and further your manager’s priorities.

Your manager says, for example, that she expects you to write and post two blog posts for the company’s website while she is away. In meeting with her before she left for vacation, she also shared with you that one of her organizational priorities is that the company starts being seen as a thought leader in the industry. To exceed expectations and help the company be seen as a thought leader, brainstorm and develop a strategy that will generate innovative content and get more people to read the blog.

Exceeding expectations is the sign of a leader. It will impress your manager, and it can inspire others to go above and beyond what they have been asked to do.

5. Debrief your manager.

Before your manager starts back at work, consider sending him a brief email with a high-level status update of your progress while he was on vacation. Meet with you manager in the first couple of days after he returns to go over details. (Consider scheduling this meeting even before he leaves town.)

This meeting with your manager is your opportunity to share what happened while he was away. If you accomplished a lot or had great success either individually or collectively, tell him. Do not devalue your accomplishments or rationalize your successes so they seem less meaningful. At the same time, tell your manager of any issues you encountered, how you managed them, and what you learned from such situations.

Debriefing your manager is an opportunity to shine but more importantly an opportunity to demonstrate your leadership. Leadership is not just about successes. Leadership is about handling challenges effectively that will inform future actions.

Is your manager on or about to leave for vacation? If you want to be promotion-ready by the time your manager returns, you have to demonstrate your leadership. Communicate effectively, manage people and projects, and exceed expectations.


Avery Blank is a millennial lawyer, strategist, and women’s advocate who helps others to strategically position and advocate for themselves to achieve their individual and organization goals. This article “Prep For A Promotion: 5 Ways To Step Up While Your Boss Is On Vacation This Summer” was originally published on Forbes. 

 

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women. 
Join us by reviewing your employer!

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