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BY Fairygodboss

Independence and Great Money? Check Out This Great Career for Women

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TAGS: Career advice, Career goals, Finance, Wealth management

Women excel at different - but equally essential - business traits from men, according to a recent book called The Athena Doctrine. Generally speaking, women are better at making future plans, having empathy and demonstrating loyalty.

Because these are areas in which women excel, it turns out that becoming a female financial advisor is a great career path that more women should consider. While there is most definitely an old-school stereotype of the male money manager, women who become financial advisors find themselves rewarded with strong client relationships, stimulating work, flexible schedules and a high income to book.

If you haven’t considered a career as a financial advisor, here are 6 reasons you should:

1. Clear objectives

Many women find themselves frustrated in a workplace where the proverbial yardstick that measures their performance is unclear. Recent data released by Fairygodboss shows that promotion is the #1 area in which women think their workplace shows gender bias.

As a financial advisor, your job expectations are crystal clear - and you will know clearly where your performance stands based upon client retention, recruitment and loyalty.

2. Independence

If you are one of the many employees who hate being micromanaged, then being a financial advisor is a great career for you. As a financial advisor, you are effectively your own boss and you can blaze your own trail instead of following a pre-prescribed company career path.

3.Flexibility

Worried about facetime or a punishing workplace culture? Most financial advisors create their own schedule, so it’s easy to build in flexibility for the things that matter to you -- whether it is making time for workouts, your children’s soccer games, or even community service. As a financial advisor, your results matter way more than the hours you work. And, you can easily work from home or anywhere else.

4. Great Relationships

Success as a financial advisor is all about building great relationships with your clients and prospects. If you are the kind of person who enjoys getting to know people, then being a financial advisor is a great way to build a network of interesting, successful, dynamic professionals.

5. Income

One of the most gratifying parts of being a financial advisor is that you really are the driver of your own income. Instead of worrying about overall company performance or a manager’s discretion to drive your income, you will be paid specifically based on the work you contribute.

6. A Strong Support Network

At top financial companies, when you start out as a financial consultant, the company provides an infrastructure to help you get started. You’ll receive mentoring, education, sponsorship to take key certification tests, and more.

If you think being a financial consultant might be the right next step in your career, visit our Wealth Management discussion board to ask tough, anonymous questions to the female financial advisors in the Fairygodboss community.

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women. 
Join us by reviewing your employer!

Related Community Discussions

  • My friend just told me (she was trying to be nice) that I'm limiting my career potential because I don't wear makeup to work. Do you think she's right? Do I need to wear makeup to be "professional?"

  • I am highly skilled with a background in marketing management (MBA in Finace and Marketing), process improvement (Six Sigma), project management and research. I have been ranked number 3 in quality performance and recognized by a CEO for my innovativeness. I have taken serval (3) years off from the corporate environment to take care a relative that has significant chronic medical issues. I am ready to go back to work, but I have contraint. I want to be available - so I do not want to travel more than 20%. I do not want to work extreme hours - I want a balanced life. I am trying to relocate to the Raleigh/Durham area in North Carolina, so that I can oversee my relative's care, but I realize that this may not be possible.

    Watching this health crisis unfold has taught me that I do not need to make 6 figures. I want work that makes a difference and pays well. I am not a spring chicken (59 years olds). I documents that show the quality of my work.

    Where do I find a company that will provide the mental stimulation and flexibility. I like to think, solve hard problem and significantly change companies in positive way. I like the think tank environment.

    How do I search for and find a good fit?

  • Hi Fairygodbosses! I am writing here on behalf of my mom because I love and want the best for her. She has been working at a non-profit for the last 9 years and has become miserable at work. She wants a career change but doesn't know what she wants to do or how to get there. She is only now making the salary she should be making at 58 years old and I think that holds her back from taking a chance and leaving her company. Do any fairy godbosses here have some advice or resources for a middle-aged woman looking for a career change (and feels like a life change)? How can my mom build her confidence and self-worth to go after what truly makes her happy (or at least start trying to figure it out?) Appreciate any of your thoughts.

  • What to do if you face a step down in your career due to the break you took of 6 months to take care of your newborn? Does this happen frequently? Any ideas on how to get a job after this break? Please help! I was working as a Sales Manager in a company where I had to quit as I needed to give sometime to my baby. Now when I'm trying to start working again, I don't get even considered due to the break I took. The HR in these companies advice me to step down in the position and start from senior sales associate or reception. I do have good experience being good at my job and my previous employer have everything good to say about me. What should I do?

  • I think I'm being mommy-tracked at work and it's incredibly frustrating. I'm two months back from maternity leave and putting in the same hours as I used to but I'm getting these subtle signs that I'm not taken as seriously -- ranging from not being asked about wanting to spearhead things to the stink eye when I walk out the door (at the same time I roughly used to leave the office). What should I do?

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Independence and Great Money? Check Out This Great Career for Women

Independence and Great Money? Check Out This Great Career for Women

Women excel at different - but equally essential - business traits from men, according to a recent book called The Athena Doctrine. Generally speaki...

Women excel at different - but equally essential - business traits from men, according to a recent book called The Athena Doctrine. Generally speaking, women are better at making future plans, having empathy and demonstrating loyalty.

Because these are areas in which women excel, it turns out that becoming a female financial advisor is a great career path that more women should consider. While there is most definitely an old-school stereotype of the male money manager, women who become financial advisors find themselves rewarded with strong client relationships, stimulating work, flexible schedules and a high income to book.

If you haven’t considered a career as a financial advisor, here are 6 reasons you should:

1. Clear objectives

Many women find themselves frustrated in a workplace where the proverbial yardstick that measures their performance is unclear. Recent data released by Fairygodboss shows that promotion is the #1 area in which women think their workplace shows gender bias.

As a financial advisor, your job expectations are crystal clear - and you will know clearly where your performance stands based upon client retention, recruitment and loyalty.

2. Independence

If you are one of the many employees who hate being micromanaged, then being a financial advisor is a great career for you. As a financial advisor, you are effectively your own boss and you can blaze your own trail instead of following a pre-prescribed company career path.

3.Flexibility

Worried about facetime or a punishing workplace culture? Most financial advisors create their own schedule, so it’s easy to build in flexibility for the things that matter to you -- whether it is making time for workouts, your children’s soccer games, or even community service. As a financial advisor, your results matter way more than the hours you work. And, you can easily work from home or anywhere else.

4. Great Relationships

Success as a financial advisor is all about building great relationships with your clients and prospects. If you are the kind of person who enjoys getting to know people, then being a financial advisor is a great way to build a network of interesting, successful, dynamic professionals.

5. Income

One of the most gratifying parts of being a financial advisor is that you really are the driver of your own income. Instead of worrying about overall company performance or a manager’s discretion to drive your income, you will be paid specifically based on the work you contribute.

6. A Strong Support Network

At top financial companies, when you start out as a financial consultant, the company provides an infrastructure to help you get started. You’ll receive mentoring, education, sponsorship to take key certification tests, and more.

If you think being a financial consultant might be the right next step in your career, visit our Wealth Management discussion board to ask tough, anonymous questions to the female financial advisors in the Fairygodboss community.

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women. 
Join us by reviewing your employer!

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