Article creator image

BY Fairygodboss

3 Ways to Recharge Over The Weekend..Without Giving Up Your Phone

Sleeping

Photo credit: Creative Commons

TAGS: Health, Women in the workplace, Working moms, Work-life balance, Career advice

Former Padmasree Warrior, CEO of NextEV, and former CTO of Cisco is known among circles of high-achieving women for taking a “digital detox” day during the weekend. While Warrior was in a uniquely demanding managerial and leadership role, she was senior enough to be able to make that conscious decision. For many of the rest of us, that’s simply not realistic.

Even those of us who don’t work outside the home at all on weekends know what the all-wise Oprah is known for saying: “[Women] put themselves last on the list…believe it’s okay to be a ‘sacrificial lamb’ within their own families….The challenge for women is that they must re-language what it means to be a wife and a mother. Being a good wife and mother means that if you don’t take care of yourself, in the long run you are ultimately harming all the other people you love in your life.” This is true of single women as well, who are often the ones taking care baskets to sick friends, attending birthday parties and events for family members or even on babysitting duty.

So how do we balance the fact that we may have managers or families or friends that need to reach us, and are demanding time of us during the weekend when many of us simply want to put up our feet for a few moments?

Here are 3 ways to recharge over the weekend. None of them necessarily take a very long time, but they create the space for you to rejuvenate and become better for all the people and responsibilities that need you:

1. Get some exercise.

Movement is truly healing. Whatever your level of physical fitness, take a lesson from Ellyn Shook, CHRO of Accenture who has written about the importance of exercise to her productivity and health. There is ample evidence that the body doesn’t distinguish between physical and psychological stress, and that in either case, the body (and mind) suffers. That is why regular exercise is important to improving your mood, as well as fighting anxiety and depression. Especially if your weekday work is largely sedentary, make it a point to just take a quick walk. You don’t have to be a gym rat in order to reap the benefits of physical movement.

2. Get some extra sleep, and barring that, simply lie down for a few moments.

Sometimes this isn’t possible but many times, it’s just that we’re not making the time. Even those of us with newborns can try to nap when our babies nap. And for the rest of us, it can be worth it to go to bed a bit early one night instead of staying out late at a party. Listen to your body and you will emerge from the weekend, recharged and at your best. Arianna Huffington, founder of the Huffington Post has written a compelling book all about the importance of sleep, and how it was a discovery she made that impacted her career in positive ways.

3. Take time to do nothing. Consciously.

Non-stop work takes it’s toll. While you might be able to answer another email, write another report, add another analysis to the presentation you’re making, without a true mental break you are simply not going to be creative and see the bigger picture. “Doing nothing” means different things to different people, but it generally means taking your mind and body off of whatever it is that you’re normally fixated on (whether that’s your family, friends, or work). For high-octane professionals, it’s often very difficult to accept the concept of “doing nothing”. Everyone has their own version of what this means…but it usually means emerging feeling more rested than before you did it.

Here’s hoping you’re getting some rest this weekend!

Have you found it hard to really relax over the weekend or found any methods that help you unwind? If so, share your advice and opinions with other women in our community.

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women.

Related Community Discussions

  • My company recently put in a nursing room/mother's room but it was designed in a way that the majority of the room is fogged glass - except one strip that runs right at sitting level that was left as transparent glass. I don't think it was done intentionally (men designed the room) but I now have to put up sheets of paper to cover the transparent strip of glass. Any idea on how to address this with my (all male) management team?

  • I recently had a child and worked out an arrangement with my manager to work from home 1-2 days/week. I'm the only female on my team and none of the co-workers have a similar arrangement. There have been discreet comments made about my schedule (mostly in a joking way) but it still feels uncomfortable. Has anyone else ran into this?

  • I need some advice. I recently took maternity leave, which ended up turning in to Temporary Disability Leave because of some medical complications I had after the baby was delivered. I returned back to work after being off for 24 weeks. I have returned to the same job and have tried to get back into the swing of corporate life + new baby (first time mom here) and have the opportunity to take an additional 4 weeks off paid by the state, but it needs to be taken and completed before my child turns 12 months old and that's fast approaching.

    I submitted a request to HR to take temporary leave of absence and my HR department is denying me the ability to take this leave, stating that I exhausted the 13 weeks FMLA that the company offers (has to offer) to all employees. They are saying that I don't qualify for this leave until a full 12 months after my initial leave started. Everything I have read online and everyone I have talked to say that FMLA and TCI leave are completely different and separate. Technically, I think I am allowed to take this leave, the State says I qualify for it, but it's now in my employers hands and I am afraid if they deny me, and I choose to still take the leave, that I will not have job security. The brochure talking about TCI doesn't say anything about FMLA being the deciding factor "http://www.dlt.ri.gov/tdi/pdf/TCIBrochure.pdf."

    Does anyone know what my rights are? Can I legally take the 4 weeks off, and still have a job to return back to? Given that I had to take so much time off, do I still qualify for job protection and benefits?

    Thank you for any an all help.

  • I need some advice. I recently took maternity leave, which ended up turning in to Temporary Disability Leave because of some medical complications I had after the baby was delivered. I returned back to work after being off for 24 weeks. I have returned to the same job and have tried to get back into the swing of corporate life + new baby (first time mom here) and have the opportunity to take an additional 4 weeks off paid by the state, but it needs to be taken and completed before my child turns 12 months old and that's fast approaching.

    I submitted a request to HR to take temporary leave of absence and my HR department is denying me the ability to take this leave, stating that I exhausted the 13 weeks FMLA that the company offers (has to offer) to all employees. They are saying that I don't qualify for this leave until a full 12 months after my initial leave started. Everything I have read online and everyone I have talked to say that FMLA and TCI leave are completely different and separate. Technically, I think I am allowed to take this leave, the State says I qualify for it, but it's now in my employers hands and I am afraid if they deny me, and I choose to still take the leave, that I will not have job security. The brochure talking about TCI doesn't say anything about FMLA being the deciding factor "http://www.dlt.ri.gov/tdi/pdf/TCIBrochure.pdf."

    Does anyone know what my rights are? Can I legally take the 4 weeks off, and still have a job to return back to? Given that I had to take so much time off, do I still qualify for job protection and benefits?

    Thank you for any an all help.

  • I am currently 36 weeks pregnant and gearing up to go on maternity leave at the end of the month. I recently came across a new job oppurnity that would be better for my family. I'm at the finishing stages of interviewing with this new company and I am worried that I will find out I got the job while on maternity leave. My question is, what happens to my maternity benefits and how do I go about leaving my current job without issue?

Find Out

What are women saying about your company?

Click Here

Share This

  • Facebook
  • Twitter
  • Share with Friends
  • Share Anonymously

3 Ways to Recharge Over The Weekend..Without Giving Up Your Phone

3 Ways to Recharge Over The Weekend..Without Giving Up Your Phone

Former Padmasree Warrior, CEO of NextEV, and former CTO of Cisco is known among circles of high-achieving women for taking a “digital detox&rd...

Former Padmasree Warrior, CEO of NextEV, and former CTO of Cisco is known among circles of high-achieving women for taking a “digital detox” day during the weekend. While Warrior was in a uniquely demanding managerial and leadership role, she was senior enough to be able to make that conscious decision. For many of the rest of us, that’s simply not realistic.

Even those of us who don’t work outside the home at all on weekends know what the all-wise Oprah is known for saying: “[Women] put themselves last on the list…believe it’s okay to be a ‘sacrificial lamb’ within their own families….The challenge for women is that they must re-language what it means to be a wife and a mother. Being a good wife and mother means that if you don’t take care of yourself, in the long run you are ultimately harming all the other people you love in your life.” This is true of single women as well, who are often the ones taking care baskets to sick friends, attending birthday parties and events for family members or even on babysitting duty.

So how do we balance the fact that we may have managers or families or friends that need to reach us, and are demanding time of us during the weekend when many of us simply want to put up our feet for a few moments?

Here are 3 ways to recharge over the weekend. None of them necessarily take a very long time, but they create the space for you to rejuvenate and become better for all the people and responsibilities that need you:

1. Get some exercise.

Movement is truly healing. Whatever your level of physical fitness, take a lesson from Ellyn Shook, CHRO of Accenture who has written about the importance of exercise to her productivity and health. There is ample evidence that the body doesn’t distinguish between physical and psychological stress, and that in either case, the body (and mind) suffers. That is why regular exercise is important to improving your mood, as well as fighting anxiety and depression. Especially if your weekday work is largely sedentary, make it a point to just take a quick walk. You don’t have to be a gym rat in order to reap the benefits of physical movement.

2. Get some extra sleep, and barring that, simply lie down for a few moments.

Sometimes this isn’t possible but many times, it’s just that we’re not making the time. Even those of us with newborns can try to nap when our babies nap. And for the rest of us, it can be worth it to go to bed a bit early one night instead of staying out late at a party. Listen to your body and you will emerge from the weekend, recharged and at your best. Arianna Huffington, founder of the Huffington Post has written a compelling book all about the importance of sleep, and how it was a discovery she made that impacted her career in positive ways.

3. Take time to do nothing. Consciously.

Non-stop work takes it’s toll. While you might be able to answer another email, write another report, add another analysis to the presentation you’re making, without a true mental break you are simply not going to be creative and see the bigger picture. “Doing nothing” means different things to different people, but it generally means taking your mind and body off of whatever it is that you’re normally fixated on (whether that’s your family, friends, or work). For high-octane professionals, it’s often very difficult to accept the concept of “doing nothing”. Everyone has their own version of what this means…but it usually means emerging feeling more rested than before you did it.

Here’s hoping you’re getting some rest this weekend!

Have you found it hard to really relax over the weekend or found any methods that help you unwind? If so, share your advice and opinions with other women in our community.

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women.

thumbnail 1 summary