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BY Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss Job Listings and Why You Should Always Be Browsing

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TAGS: Job search, Career advice, Compensation, Fairygodboss

Today, Fairygodboss is excited to launch a new job board. There are so many already out there, so what makes our different?

For starters, every job on our site has been selected with you in mind. The very large aggregation job listing sites like LinkedIn, Glassdoor and Indeed, among others have millions of jobs. That can certainly be an advantages if you’re trying to cast the widest possible net in your job search and we wholeheartedly recommend any job seeker look under every nook and cranny if they’re serious about changing jobs.

However, if what you’re looking for is a job with an employer who really cares about recruiting women and is specifically trying to reach you because they care about gender diversity and equality, then the jobs listed by our employer partners are worth a close look. Remember, these employer partners have gone out on a limb, choosing to embrace transparency when they could have very easily shied away from embracing what their female workforce thinks and says about them on our site. Our partners tend to be progressive, have some of the best benefits around, and truly believe in reaching and supporting female talent.

Even if you’re perfectly happy with your position, it’s important to understand that you should always be on the look-out for new opportunities. One head of Talent Acquisition we know told us that he believes that every two years, an existing employee needs to be “resold” on why they should stay. In other words, recruitment isn’t just from the outside talent pool into the employee base, but it must also happen internally. Otherwise, talent leaves or may be tempted to leave.

There are good reasons why everyone in the workforce should consider new roles, even if it means just keeping an eye out on what’s going on out there. For starters, your wealth may depend on it.

Employees in the U.S. can expect an average base salary increase of 3.1% in 2016. After inflation (which is projected to be 2.4% in 2016), this amounts to a “real” increase of 0.6% for the average worker. On the other hand, the average raise an employee receives when they receive a new job is “8-10% in a healthy economic market”.

The bottom line? Staying put in your job may mean you are missing out on the possibility of wage growth. In fact, a taxation and income expert, Cameron Keng, puts it very starkly: “Staying employed at the same company for over two years on average is going to make you earn less over your lifetime by about 50% or more.”

Why are people who jump ship rewarded, while loyal employees punished? Keng ascribes this  to low expectations for wage growth among the workforce paired with a different motivation for compensation when it comes to new hires. Keng interviewed Bethany Devine, a senior hiring manager in Silicon Valley, who has worked with Intuit and other Fortune 500 companies. Devine said she noticed that she saw people who switched companies every few years usually commanded a higher salary.

She says: “The problem with staying at a company forever is you start with a base salary and usually annual raises are based on a percentage of your current salary. There is often a limit to how high your manager can bump you up since it’s based on a percentage of your current salary. However, if you move to another company, you start fresh and can usually command a higher base salary to hire you. Companies competing for talent are often not afraid to pay more when hiring if it means they can hire the best talent. Same thing applies for titles.”

To be fair, job-hopping isn’t the solution for everyone and not every company pays external hires more than internal employee pay raises. But be aware of this phenomenon because small differences in compensation every year do compound over time.

Money isn’t the only reason to keep your eye on the job market. Making sure your skills align with new, open positions gives you a sense of where the market is headed in the longer term and whether you might have to try to get some new experiences and projects under your belt. And you never know when a new, exciting position will come along that seems to suit your background and interests.

Remember: the worst time to look for a job is when you’ve gotten yourself into a situation where you have no choice. Browsing for jobs is harmless and free — so take a look! To make it easy, every week we will send you a hand-picked selection of a few interesting jobs. #AlwaysBeBrowsing!

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women.
Join us by reviewing your employer!
 

 

Related Community Discussions

  • I'm thinking about not coming back to work after my maternity leave -- even if I have to pay some of the pay I receive during leave. Nobody has asked me about whether I'm going to come back (they are just acting as if this will definitely happen when we talk about longer term projects) but I feel hugely guilty....and sometimes I think I should just quit now. Anyone been in this situation? any advice?

  • I am trying to change career paths. I was laid off in Nov. 2016. I spoke with a master resume writer yesterday who recommended an entirely new resume, LinkedIn overhaul, valuation letter and summary/biography all for close to $3000. I also received a call for an interview for a part-time job, $10/hour, no benefits. Needless to say I burst into tears by the end of the day.

    I had high hope when I obtained my law degree (especially after working full-time & attending night classes). I've tried contacting the law school and my undergrad career centers but have received only nominal assistance. They both wished me luck, gave me login's to their job portals and had nothing more to suggest.

    Someone mentioned networking & I agree that is an option but here in Michigan is comes with a fee to attend events, seminars or join associations. I understand we are all trying to make money but I graduated from law school during the recession and have 6 figures in student loans. I also am running out of unemployment.

    The master resume writer explained only 15% of people get hired from online applications. Is that true? If so then why are we even bothering with an online system at all? She suggested I find the hiring manager & connect with that person. The hiring manager is sometimes 2 people deep in the company so how do I find the person who told HR that they need a person for X job?

    I've reached out to people on LinkedIn and have not gotten much response or advice. Are there any mentors or HR people that can suggest anything that is free? My mom thinks I should go back to school but with a BA and JD that I am still paying for adding to the debt with no promises that another degree will land me a job doesn't seem wise.

    I am frustrated, disheartened and angry that the process of finding a job has become so convoluted but understand why it has. I've read so many articles on LinkedIn that they conflict with one another...you need a cover letter, no you need a pain letter, don't bother you don't need these because HR won't read it. Your resume needs skills, don't list your skills, list dates, don't list dates, take off references. Which article do I believe? Adding insult to injury the unemployment agency here requires your resume to be uploaded to the talent network. Do you know what companies contacted me expressing interest in my skill-set? Tru-Green lawn care as a fertilizer sprayer and a local manufacture as a line-worker. Is that all I am capable of and are they even reading my resume?

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  • Does anyone here work for Earnst & Young? I see their communications department is hiring for multiple roles I think I'm qualified for. I'd like to learn more "inside scoop" from a current or former employee. Also looking to learn more about how this department is structured so I can figure out which of the positions I should apply for. Don't want to apply for all of them and have it look as if I'm spamming them with my resume.

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Fairygodboss Job Listings and Why You Should Always Be Browsing

Fairygodboss Job Listings and Why You Should Always Be Browsing

Today, Fairygodboss is excited to launch a new job board . There are so many already out there, so what makes our different? For starters, every job ...

Today, Fairygodboss is excited to launch a new job board. There are so many already out there, so what makes our different?

For starters, every job on our site has been selected with you in mind. The very large aggregation job listing sites like LinkedIn, Glassdoor and Indeed, among others have millions of jobs. That can certainly be an advantages if you’re trying to cast the widest possible net in your job search and we wholeheartedly recommend any job seeker look under every nook and cranny if they’re serious about changing jobs.

However, if what you’re looking for is a job with an employer who really cares about recruiting women and is specifically trying to reach you because they care about gender diversity and equality, then the jobs listed by our employer partners are worth a close look. Remember, these employer partners have gone out on a limb, choosing to embrace transparency when they could have very easily shied away from embracing what their female workforce thinks and says about them on our site. Our partners tend to be progressive, have some of the best benefits around, and truly believe in reaching and supporting female talent.

Even if you’re perfectly happy with your position, it’s important to understand that you should always be on the look-out for new opportunities. One head of Talent Acquisition we know told us that he believes that every two years, an existing employee needs to be “resold” on why they should stay. In other words, recruitment isn’t just from the outside talent pool into the employee base, but it must also happen internally. Otherwise, talent leaves or may be tempted to leave.

There are good reasons why everyone in the workforce should consider new roles, even if it means just keeping an eye out on what’s going on out there. For starters, your wealth may depend on it.

Employees in the U.S. can expect an average base salary increase of 3.1% in 2016. After inflation (which is projected to be 2.4% in 2016), this amounts to a “real” increase of 0.6% for the average worker. On the other hand, the average raise an employee receives when they receive a new job is “8-10% in a healthy economic market”.

The bottom line? Staying put in your job may mean you are missing out on the possibility of wage growth. In fact, a taxation and income expert, Cameron Keng, puts it very starkly: “Staying employed at the same company for over two years on average is going to make you earn less over your lifetime by about 50% or more.”

Why are people who jump ship rewarded, while loyal employees punished? Keng ascribes this  to low expectations for wage growth among the workforce paired with a different motivation for compensation when it comes to new hires. Keng interviewed Bethany Devine, a senior hiring manager in Silicon Valley, who has worked with Intuit and other Fortune 500 companies. Devine said she noticed that she saw people who switched companies every few years usually commanded a higher salary.

She says: “The problem with staying at a company forever is you start with a base salary and usually annual raises are based on a percentage of your current salary. There is often a limit to how high your manager can bump you up since it’s based on a percentage of your current salary. However, if you move to another company, you start fresh and can usually command a higher base salary to hire you. Companies competing for talent are often not afraid to pay more when hiring if it means they can hire the best talent. Same thing applies for titles.”

To be fair, job-hopping isn’t the solution for everyone and not every company pays external hires more than internal employee pay raises. But be aware of this phenomenon because small differences in compensation every year do compound over time.

Money isn’t the only reason to keep your eye on the job market. Making sure your skills align with new, open positions gives you a sense of where the market is headed in the longer term and whether you might have to try to get some new experiences and projects under your belt. And you never know when a new, exciting position will come along that seems to suit your background and interests.

Remember: the worst time to look for a job is when you’ve gotten yourself into a situation where you have no choice. Browsing for jobs is harmless and free — so take a look! To make it easy, every week we will send you a hand-picked selection of a few interesting jobs. #AlwaysBeBrowsing!

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women.
Join us by reviewing your employer!
 

 

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