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BY Fairygodboss

Understanding How to Improve Women's Satisfaction at Work

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Photo credit: Fairygodboss

TAGS: Women in the workplace, Gender equality, Maternity leave, Millennials, Diversity, ADP, Work-life balance, Prudential, Research

At Fairygodboss, we're fortunate to have a unique perspective into the candid experiences of thousands of women in the workplace. Our community comprise young and affluent women: nearly 65% are Millennials (under 35) and 73% of respondents report earning more than $50,000 per year in salary.

They are also relatively satisfied in their jobs, overall. Analyzing thousands of anonymous job reviews women have posted, 57% rated their job experience a 4 or higher on a scale of 1-5 where 5 represents maximum job satisfaction.

Nearly a year after our March 2015 launch, we've worked with a statistician who has culled through the reviews and and reviewed their tags them for common themes and topics. The result: we are able to gain a sense for 5 of the key factors that are highly related to job satisfaction for women:

1. Women are more satisfied where gender equality prevails.

Women who rate their experience highly in terms of job satisfaction are more likely to commend their employer for having a culture where women are treated fairly across many dimensions. As an example, one woman at American Express wrote: "Women are treated equally for promotions. There are still more male senior executives but it does seem like the company is devoting major efforts to promote women."

2. Women are more satisfied when they see gender-balanced management teams.

Women who posted high job satisfaction observed many women throughout the management ranks above them, indicating both opportunity and support for their careers. From a woman at Prudential: "I've worked here for over 5 years and there are many women working here. Several women in leadership which is great to see."

3. Women are more satisfied at employers who promote work/life balance.

Work/life balance emerges as a major theme in our research. We see a high correlation between women's job satisfaction and comments such as this one from a research engineer: "New Balance is very respectful of the fact that employees (both men and women) have a life outside of work...There is virtually no pressure to work longer hours on a regular basis. Using all your vacation/paid time off as needed is also perfectly OK."

4. Women are more satisfied at employers with family-friendly values and practices.

In many job reviews on our site, it becomes clear that women are more satisfied working for employers who have empathy and respect for their responsibilities at home. From a Vice President at ADP: "ADP has allowed me to provide for my family financially, and I have not ever missed anything for my children...which makes me run through brick walls for ADP."

5. Women are more satisfied when they have received and taken more paid maternity leave.

Fairygodboss has observed a direct correlation between the length of paid maternity leave a woman takes and their job satisfaction. One woman at Johnson & Johnson said: "In the 6 years I have worked here, I have seen some truly amazing things. For example, paid maternity leave is paid at 100% of the employee's salary, is not held against them, and was recently extended from 12 weeks to 17 weeks."

For employers who are committed to improving the numbers and experiences of women in the workplace, it is essential to understand the factors and levers that impact female talent's decisions about where to work -- and stay. Once the factors are clearly identified, employers can begin to break down the obstacles that prevent women from achieving success throughout the senior ranks of organizations, allocating resources wisely and deliberately.

For a closer look at our data, please review Fairygodboss' presentation on female job satisfaction.

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women.
Join us by reviewing your employer!
 

 

Related Community Discussions

  • I recently got engaged, will be married October 2017. My fiance and I want to start a family right away. My job does not have paid maternity leave. Would it be premature for me to advocate for paid leave? My initial thought process was to figure this out as soon as possible. Maybe I should start looking for another job; researching other companies I noticed that most (all the one's that I saw) require employees to have been employed for a year before being offered paid maternity leave.

    If I could have my way I would stay where I am at and get paid leave.

    I have a positive relationship with my boss and can talk about this with him, however; he isn't the one who ultimately makes this decision, corporate does.

  • I need some advice. I recently took maternity leave, which ended up turning in to Temporary Disability Leave because of some medical complications I had after the baby was delivered. I returned back to work after being off for 24 weeks. I have returned to the same job and have tried to get back into the swing of corporate life + new baby (first time mom here) and have the opportunity to take an additional 4 weeks off paid by the state, but it needs to be taken and completed before my child turns 12 months old and that's fast approaching.

    I submitted a request to HR to take temporary leave of absence and my HR department is denying me the ability to take this leave, stating that I exhausted the 13 weeks FMLA that the company offers (has to offer) to all employees. They are saying that I don't qualify for this leave until a full 12 months after my initial leave started. Everything I have read online and everyone I have talked to say that FMLA and TCI leave are completely different and separate. Technically, I think I am allowed to take this leave, the State says I qualify for it, but it's now in my employers hands and I am afraid if they deny me, and I choose to still take the leave, that I will not have job security. The brochure talking about TCI doesn't say anything about FMLA being the deciding factor "http://www.dlt.ri.gov/tdi/pdf/TCIBrochure.pdf."

    Does anyone know what my rights are? Can I legally take the 4 weeks off, and still have a job to return back to? Given that I had to take so much time off, do I still qualify for job protection and benefits?

    Thank you for any an all help.

  • I am currently 36 weeks pregnant and gearing up to go on maternity leave at the end of the month. I recently came across a new job oppurnity that would be better for my family. I'm at the finishing stages of interviewing with this new company and I am worried that I will find out I got the job while on maternity leave. My question is, what happens to my maternity benefits and how do I go about leaving my current job without issue?

  • Any advice for someone searching for work during their first trimester of pregnancy? I currently work with a temp agency for income and am applying for my next role. From what I've read on the boards, it seems that most women are firmly established at their companies but I was forced to look for a new role outside of my former company due to a health condition. They were unwilling to move me to a different role within the company. Any suggestions on how to navigate the next 4-6 months before giving birth?

  • I'm 12 weeks pregnant and just met with HR to find out about our Maternity Leave program only to learn that they only give us unpaid leave (you have to file for state disability to get your 55% salary during those weeks) In talking with other moms, I found they all came back early (because who can really afford to take a big pay cut when you have a new little one to tend to?)

    It never occurred to me to check because kids weren't on the radar when I applied for the job, but I'm totally disheartened that my company that "prides itself" on caring about its people doesn't have something better in place. Has anyone gone to HR to see about improving their policies? I know as a whole our organization had a 12 year tenure when I started and a pretty high average age, so it may have not been on their radar, but I'm shocked that they aren't more progressive. Any advice??

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Understanding How to Improve Women's Satisfaction at Work

Understanding How to Improve Women's Satisfaction at Work

At Fairygodboss, we're fortunate to have a unique perspective into the candid experiences of thousands of women in the workplace. Our community comprise...

At Fairygodboss, we're fortunate to have a unique perspective into the candid experiences of thousands of women in the workplace. Our community comprise young and affluent women: nearly 65% are Millennials (under 35) and 73% of respondents report earning more than $50,000 per year in salary.

They are also relatively satisfied in their jobs, overall. Analyzing thousands of anonymous job reviews women have posted, 57% rated their job experience a 4 or higher on a scale of 1-5 where 5 represents maximum job satisfaction.

Nearly a year after our March 2015 launch, we've worked with a statistician who has culled through the reviews and and reviewed their tags them for common themes and topics. The result: we are able to gain a sense for 5 of the key factors that are highly related to job satisfaction for women:

1. Women are more satisfied where gender equality prevails.

Women who rate their experience highly in terms of job satisfaction are more likely to commend their employer for having a culture where women are treated fairly across many dimensions. As an example, one woman at American Express wrote: "Women are treated equally for promotions. There are still more male senior executives but it does seem like the company is devoting major efforts to promote women."

2. Women are more satisfied when they see gender-balanced management teams.

Women who posted high job satisfaction observed many women throughout the management ranks above them, indicating both opportunity and support for their careers. From a woman at Prudential: "I've worked here for over 5 years and there are many women working here. Several women in leadership which is great to see."

3. Women are more satisfied at employers who promote work/life balance.

Work/life balance emerges as a major theme in our research. We see a high correlation between women's job satisfaction and comments such as this one from a research engineer: "New Balance is very respectful of the fact that employees (both men and women) have a life outside of work...There is virtually no pressure to work longer hours on a regular basis. Using all your vacation/paid time off as needed is also perfectly OK."

4. Women are more satisfied at employers with family-friendly values and practices.

In many job reviews on our site, it becomes clear that women are more satisfied working for employers who have empathy and respect for their responsibilities at home. From a Vice President at ADP: "ADP has allowed me to provide for my family financially, and I have not ever missed anything for my children...which makes me run through brick walls for ADP."

5. Women are more satisfied when they have received and taken more paid maternity leave.

Fairygodboss has observed a direct correlation between the length of paid maternity leave a woman takes and their job satisfaction. One woman at Johnson & Johnson said: "In the 6 years I have worked here, I have seen some truly amazing things. For example, paid maternity leave is paid at 100% of the employee's salary, is not held against them, and was recently extended from 12 weeks to 17 weeks."

For employers who are committed to improving the numbers and experiences of women in the workplace, it is essential to understand the factors and levers that impact female talent's decisions about where to work -- and stay. Once the factors are clearly identified, employers can begin to break down the obstacles that prevent women from achieving success throughout the senior ranks of organizations, allocating resources wisely and deliberately.

For a closer look at our data, please review Fairygodboss' presentation on female job satisfaction.

Fairygodboss

Fairygodboss is committed to improving the workplace and lives of women.
Join us by reviewing your employer!
 

 

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